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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 135 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 53 9 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 50 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for James or search for James in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
on for turning, during this flank march, his retreat into an irreparable rout. In relinquishing the idea of covering the York River road, he deceived all the calculations of the enemy. The more the latter extended his lines on the right, the easier it became for McClellan to establish, by his left, new communications with the James. This done, he could concentrate the whole of his army on the right bank of the Chickahominy, and, if forced by circumstances, proceed in the direction of the James by crossing White Oak Swamp, or, if a favorable opportunity offered, even take advantage of Lee's eccentric movement to march direct upon Richmond, and enter that city before him. Once established on the James, he was free to reascend this river in order to attack the Confederate capital, or to cross it to undertake a new campaign on the south side with greater chances of success. He could thus thrust after parrying; and if overwhelmed by numbers, he would at least have frustrated the combi
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
s, three ten-inch columbiads, and one eightinch; the ninth, at one thousand six hundred and seventy yards, five thirty-pounder Parrotts and one forty-eight pounder James (old twenty-four); the tenth, called the McClellan battery, at one thousand six hundred and fifty yards, two James eighty-four pounders (old forty-two) and two sixJames eighty-four pounders (old forty-two) and two sixty-four pounders (old thirty-two); the eleventh, at one thousand six hundred and fifty yards, four ten-inch siege mortars. The siege artillery, therefore, comprised nine thirteen-inch mortars, seven ten-inch ditto, six ten-inch columbiads, four eight-inch ditto, two of James' fortytwo pounders, two thirty-two and one twenty-four dJames' fortytwo pounders, two thirty-two and one twenty-four ditto, and five Parrott's thirty pounders, making in all twenty-six smoothbore and ten rifled guns; among these ten, only the first four named were really of a powerful calibre. The last three batteries, placed side by side, were connected by a trench, each having magazines and splinter-proof shelters. At daybreak, on the 10th o