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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for L. L. James or search for L. L. James in all documents.

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ase the enemy should attempt to repossess the forts, of which, however, there is not the slightest fear. The confederates have abandoned Florida, and I doubt if five hundred rebel soldiers can be found in the State to-day. Last evening, Lieut. L. L. James, Second artillery, of Gen. Arnold's staff, with a boat's crew, crossed the channel to Fort McRae. Lieut. James raised the Stars and Stripes on the staff where the confederate rag has so long hung. A salute was fired in honor of the old ensLieut. James raised the Stars and Stripes on the staff where the confederate rag has so long hung. A salute was fired in honor of the old ensign, and three cheers given for the Union and three for the flag. The Fort presented a sad spectacle of charred and smoking timbers, blackened walls and demolished masonry. The timber-flooring in all the casemates, which had sustained the upper tier of guns, was entirely consumed, as were the gates of the main salle porte, and the timbers of the blindages. Only three pieces of ordnance remained in the Fort--two thirty-two-pounders, from one of which a shot had been discharged during the confl
of arms, but about seven thousand five hundred, and most of them the men had rendered useless by taking out the lock-springs. They got the following guns: six twenty — four pounder howitzers; twelve six-pounder Napoleons, smooth; six three-inch James's rifled-guns; four twenty-pounder rifled Parrotts; six smooth-bores, brass. Also the following guns, which were spiked and useless, on Maryland Heights: two nine-inch Dahlgrens; one fifty-pounder rifled Parrott; six twelve-pounder howitzers; folfth Illinois, Rhode Island and Maryland. They left at nine o'clock, crossing to Maryland on the pontoon-bridge. Rebel pickets fired on them as they passed by. The artillery taken comprised the following: Twelve 3-inch rifled guns. Six James's. Six 24-pound howitzers. Four 20-pound Parrott guns. Six 12-pound guns. Four 12-pound howitzers. Two 10-inch Dahlgrens. One 50-pound Parrott. Six 6-pound guns, and several pieces of Fremont's guns, of but little value. Sev
of arms, but about seven thousand five hundred, and most of them the men had rendered useless by taking out the lock-springs. They got the following guns: six twenty — four pounder howitzers; twelve six-pounder Napoleons, smooth; six three-inch James's rifled-guns; four twenty-pounder rifled Parrotts; six smooth-bores, brass. Also the following guns, which were spiked and useless, on Maryland Heights: two nine-inch Dahlgrens; one fifty-pounder rifled Parrott; six twelve-pounder howitzers; folfth Illinois, Rhode Island and Maryland. They left at nine o'clock, crossing to Maryland on the pontoon-bridge. Rebel pickets fired on them as they passed by. The artillery taken comprised the following: Twelve 3-inch rifled guns. Six James's. Six 24-pound howitzers. Four 20-pound Parrott guns. Six 12-pound guns. Four 12-pound howitzers. Two 10-inch Dahlgrens. One 50-pound Parrott. Six 6-pound guns, and several pieces of Fremont's guns, of but little value. Sev
ant-Colonel Barnard Laiboldt of the Second, commanding. The other regiments of this brigade are the Forty-fourth and Seventy-third Illinois. Colonel Laiboldt is a man who will always maintain the credit of any corps to which he may be attached. After the preliminary battle was over, he seemed restless and uneasy, repeatedly declaring that he could not rest that night without another bout with the enemy. A portion of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry was also engaged in this action, and Colonel James, commanding it, is, as well as his regiment, highly spoken of. From the close of this combat, our cavalry took no further part in the affairs of the day, being posted in order of battle to the rear, waiting for an opportunity which never occurred. This preliminary battle, as I have said, confirmed us in the impression that here the enemy was about to make a grand effort to drive back our army. But as a division or two only had arrived, we felt it highly imprudent to assail him at onc