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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Edward Jarvis or search for Edward Jarvis in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
eabody, and Hubbard Winslow, among clergymen; Professor Thomas C. Upham, of Bowdoin College, a writer upon morals; J. Miller McKim, the Philadelphia Abolitionist; Edward Kent, of Maine, long conspicuous in public life; Henry C. Carey, the political economist; Brantz Mayer, of Baltimore, known in literature; John Jay, of New York, already earnest in the anti-slavery cause, and since distinguished in a diplomatic career; P. H. Taylor, of Andover, the accomplished teacher of the classics; Dr. Edward Jarvis, versed in statistics and medical science; James Russell Lowell, of Cambridge, and Jacob Harvey, of New York. The greater number, however, while commending its elevated sentiments, full scholarship, and ability, questioned its logical results; to wit, the disarming of nations and the abandonment of fortifications and all war preparations. Among those who wrote thus, either briefly stating their doubt, or treating more at length the use of force between nations—in addition to others w