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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 212 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 64 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Jay or search for John Jay in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
62 246.Jeff. Davis' Letter to Maryland Commissioners,362 246 1/2.New York City Home Guard,362 247.Gov. Jackson's Proclamation in Missouri, June 12,363 248.New York Volunteers, 20th Regiment,364 249.New York Volunteers, 6th Regiment, (Wilson's,)366 249 1/2.John P. Kennedy's Appeal to Maryland,368 250.J. S. Carlisle's Speech in Virginia Convention,374 251.The First Privateer--The Savannah,375 252.Massachusetts Volunteers, 1st Regiment,377 253.Germans of Kentucky, Address to,377 254.John Jay's Address in Westchester Co., N. Y.,378 255.Slaves and Slavery, (Boston Courier,)401 256.Declaration of the People of Virginia,403 257.Gen. Lyon's Proclamation in Missouri,404 258.Affair at Vienna, Va.--Reports, &c.,405 258 1/2.Battle of Booneville, Mo.,408 259.Col. Boernstein's Proclamation in Missouri,411 260.Gen. Lyon's Proclamation at Booneville,412 261.Pennsylvania Volunteers, 22d Regiment,412 262.Duke of Newcastle's Order on Privateers,413 263.New York Volunteers, 14th Regim
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
tle known, that a small parcel sent from the United States to Liverpool in 1784 was seized at the custom-house there, as an illicit importation of British colonial produce. Even as late as 1794, and by persons so intelligent as the negotiators of Jay's treaty, it was not known that cotton was an article of growth and export from the United States. In the twelfth article of that treaty, as laid before the Senate, Cotton was included with Molasses, Sugar, Coffee, and Cocoa, as articles which Amn, no not for candle-wicks to light the humble industry of the cottages of the North, which did not pay this tribute to the Southern planter. The growth of the native article, as we have seen, had not in 1794 reached a point to be known to Chief Justice Jay as one of actual or probable export. As late as 1796, the manufacturers of Brandywine in Delaware petitioned Congress for the repeal of this duty on imported cotton, and the petition was rejected on the Report of a Committee, consisting of