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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
er heard the sobriquet publicly applied was after the evacuation of Manassas, in March, 1862, while General Ewell was holding with his division the line of the Rappahannock. Our regiment had been on picket at Bealton Station as a support to Stuart's cavalry, and the enemy were rapidly advancing in large force, when another infantry regiment came down on a train of cars to relieve us. We had just gotten on the train, our friends were rapidly forming line of battle to meet the Federal advance, Jeb Stuart was going to the front with his fighting jacket on, and our train was slowly moving back, when a battery of the enemy galloped into position, and threw some shell, which shrieked through the air, and exploded uncomfortably near us. Immediately Colonel Walker called out in his clear, ringing tones, It's all right, boys. The Thirteenth Foot Cavalry are mounted at last, and we will try the speed of our horse-flesh. So saying, he ordered the engineer to increase his speed, and we rushed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
before long publish the most incontrovertible evidence that the papers published were taken from the person of Colonel Dahlgren; that they were not altered in any way, and that the charge of forgery is utterly groundless, since there was no opportunity to forge them, even if there had been the inclination. Meantime, as we wish to make our paper so conclusive that it cannot be answered, we beg any of our friends who may have facts bearing on the question to send them forward at once. Jeb. Stuart's correspondence at Lewinsville we quoted from a version we had at the time of its occurrence, but we are very much gratified to receive from our friend, Major McClellan, the following exact copy of the original: Lexington, Ky., 12th April, 1881. Rev. J. Wm. Jones: My Dear Sir,--In your interesting Reminiscences, published in the last No. of the Southern Historical Society Papers, you make mention of some correspondence which passed between General Stuart and some of his ol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
d Jackson in a state of excitement such as he never saw him in before or since. He was under the impression that his last reserve brigade had gone in, and was intensely chagrined, and annoyed that the enemy had not been driven from his position. Jeb Stuart in his fighting jacket was near by, and Jackson proposed that he should concentrate all of his cavalry and make a grand cavalry charge, but Stuart shook his head and replied: Too many cannon. But he called Jackson's attention to the fact tntil we had got possession of those heights and fortified them. After that it was a strong position. [Ibid, page 446.] These heights would have been occupied and intrenched by our infantry and artillery, but Stuart — dashing, gallant, glorious Jeb. Stuart — could not resist the temptation of stirring them up, and so soon as his advance cavalry squadrons reached these heights he sent for Pelham, the heroic boy artillerist, and a section of his horse artillery, which he ordered to open on th