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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
s-of-war. Rear-Admiral Louis M. Goldsborough was selected to command the naval expedition, and General A. E. Burnside was directed to co-operate with him: the latter to have under his command some 17,000 troops. The following is a list of the vessels which composed the naval part of the expedition, with the names of their commanders: Stars and Stripes, Lieut.-Comdg. Reed Werden; Louisiana, Lieut.-Comdg A. Murray; Hetzel, Lieut.-Comdg. H. K. Davenport; Underwriter, Lieut.-Comdg. W. N. Jeffers; Delaware, Lieut.-Comdg. S. P. Quackenbush; Commodore Perry, Lieut.-Comdg. C. W. Flusser; Valley City, Lieut-Comdg. J. C. Chaplin; Con. Barney, Act.-Lieut.-Comdg R. T. Renshaw; Hunchback, Act.-Vol.-Lt.-Comdg. E. R. Colhoun; Southfield, Act.-Vol.-Lt.-Comdg. C. F. W. Behm; Morse, Acting-Master Peter Hayes; Whitehead, Acting-Master Charles French; Lockwood, Acting-Master G. W. Graves; Brincker, Acting-Master John E. Giddings; I. N. Seymour, Acting-Master F. S. Wells; Ceres, Acting-Master
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
ssion from the Confederate government to act on his own discretion and to pass Fortress Monroe if he thought proper; ut this was denied him for prudential reasons. While the Merrimac remained intact it was supposed that Norfolk would be secure against attack, and the way for an army to Richmond would be barred by the iron-clad; all of which was in a measure true. For equally prudent reasons the Monitor was kept out of battle for the present, and lay off Fortress Monroe under command of Lieut. Jeffers. There were no Federal war vessels above Fortress Monroe, but there were three merchant sailing vessels within the bar off Hampton. Tatnall ordered Lieut. Barney, in the Jamestown, to go in and bring them out. This was accomplished, although the gunboat was fired on by the forts. Two of the vessels contained supplies for the Federal Army. This was a humiliation and should not have been suffered, but prevented at all hazards, especially as the crew of an English corvette cheered t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
ing a long reach of the river). The vessels which attacked this stronghold were the iron-clad (so-called) Galena, Commander John Rodgers, the Monitor, Lieutenant W. N. Jeffers, and the unarmored steamers Aroostook, Port Royal and Naugatuck. These vessels moved up the James River on the 15th of May and encountered no artificineers, Thomas Divine, Tim. Flanders and George West; Acting-Master's Mates, William Dunne and C. E. Rich. Iron-clad Monitor. Commanders, John L. Worden, Wm. N. Jeffers and T. H. Stevens [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant, S. Dana Greene; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. Flye; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, D. C. Logue; ASteamer rescue. Acting-Assistant Engineers, W. H. Capen and B. D. Mulligan. Steamer Underwriter. Lieutenant, Alfred Hopkins and Lieutenant-Commander, Wm. N. Jeffers [commanding at different times]; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Dan'l Harman; Acting-Assistant Engineers, John Cohill, John Morse and John Whittaker; Acting-Mast