Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Jefferson or search for Jefferson in all documents.

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out a Democrat. A bargain, by jingoes! says he; but how will we find out? Why, says I, we'll just write and ax the printer. Agreed again! says he; and by thunder! if it does turn out that Shields is a Democrat, I never will -- Jefferson! Jefferson! What do you want, Peggy? Do get through your everlasting clatter some time, and bring me a gourd of water; the child's been crying for a drink this live-long hour. Let it die, then; it may as well die for water as to be taxJefferson! What do you want, Peggy? Do get through your everlasting clatter some time, and bring me a gourd of water; the child's been crying for a drink this live-long hour. Let it die, then; it may as well die for water as to be taxed to death to fatten officers of State. Jeff run off to get the water, though, just like he hadn't been saying anything spiteful for he's a real good-hearted fellow, after all, once you get at the foundation of him. I walked into the house, and, Why, Peggy, says I, declare we like to forgot you altogether. Oh, yes, says she, when a body can't help themselves, everybody soon forgets 'em; but, thank God! by day after to-morrow I shall be well enough to milk the cows, and pen the calve
volumes, and no further sources of reference, he locked himself up in a room upstairs over a store across the street from the State House, and there, cut off from all communication and intrusion, he prepared the address. Though composed amid the unromantic surroundings of a dingy, dusty, and neglected back room, the speech has become a memorable document. Posterity will assign to it a high rank among historical utterances; and it will ever bear comparison with the efforts of Washington, Jefferson, Adams, or any that preceded its delivery from the steps of the national Capitol. After Mr. Lincoln's rise to national prominence, and especially since his death, I have often been asked if I did not write this or that paper for him; if I did not prepare or help prepare some of his speeches. I know that other and abler friends of Lincoln have been asked the same question. I know it was the general impression in Washington that I knew all about Lincoln's plans and ideas, but the tru