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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Peter Jefferson or search for Peter Jefferson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
way the mists of doubt and error that obscure the light of truth; to act for them and by deed and bright example point out the path of duty and stimulate to high endeavor. End to kingly rule. When on the 7th of June, 1776, Richard Henry Lee moved in the Continental Congress that these united colonies are and of right ought to be free and independent States, and when on the 4th day of July following that Congress adopted and published to the world the Declaration of Independence which Jefferson drew and the good people of those colonies under the lead of Washington maintained with bayonet and sword for themselves and their posterity, they put an end to kingly rule forever. But the kings they dethroned were those who rule by the accident of birth or circumstances, and not those kings of men who rule by right in very truth divine—the right of God-given powers so grand in their proportions and so honestly used for the good of their fellow-citizens for the promotion of truth and j
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
Two irreconcilable theories of Popular Government were at the outset proposed. The one advocated by Mr. Hamilton contemplated a strong centralized authority, fashioned after that of a limited monarchy; the other, which was proposed by Mr. Jefferson, recognized the people as the source of all power, and insisted that they should be left as free and untrammeled from governmental control as its exigencies might demand. The one contemplated a magnificent central government, with that ostenen and Sedition laws were passed, the effect of which was to abridge, if not imperil, the freedom of the press in its criticism upon public officials. This measure, with others of an unpopular nature, so outraged public sentiment as to elect Mr. Jefferson, the apostle of Democracy, to succeed Mr. Adams by an overwhelming majority, and the views he entertained and ably advocated laid the foundation for that great popular approval which maintained his party in power, with but brief intervals of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Burkett Davenport Fry. (search)
y, and his wife, Mary Micou, daughter of Dr. Paul Micou, a physician who sought refuge in Essex county, Virginia, from religious persecution in France. Colonel Fry was Professor of Mathematics in William and Mary College; in connection with Peter Jefferson, the father of President Jefferson, executed in 1749 the first map of Virginia founded on actual surveys, and was the commander of the Virginia forces raised for service against the French on the Ohio in 1754. The youthful George WashingtonPresident Jefferson, executed in 1749 the first map of Virginia founded on actual surveys, and was the commander of the Virginia forces raised for service against the French on the Ohio in 1754. The youthful George Washington was the lieutenant-colonel of the Virginia regiment, and on the sudden death of Colonel Fry at Will's Creek, May 31, 1754, succeeded to the command. The Rev. Henry Fry, the second son of Colonel Joshua Fry, a man of attainments and of pious usefulness, married Susan, the daughter of Dr. Thomas Walker, the pioneer explorer of Kentucky, and his wife Mildred (Thornton), widow of Nicholas Meriwether. These progenitors number among their descendants the worthy names of Bell, Bullitt, Cabell, Co