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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
report, there were only three discharges of cannon after the first fire from the Eighth. In rear of the ridge the ground sloped down into the woods, affording cover from the enemy's fire, and thus enabling Hunton's men to play havoc with the foe, with comparatively slight loss to them. When Baker advanced—as he did several times—our men rallied to the ridge, and with steady aim depleted his ranks and drove him back to the woods skirting the river. For four hours, with no other aid than Jenkins' small command, Hunton had been fighting, repulsing and holding at bay Baker's largely superior force. His ammunition was nearly gone, and his men suffering excessive fatigue. If they had not been of the staunchest type the strain would have been too great. Against such heavy odds, with ammunition and men nearly exhausted, Hunton had done all that was possible at this time; and he sent Lieutenant-Colonel Norborne Berkeley White to Evans several times for reinforcements and ammunition, bu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
illing frost, and when he thinks, good easy man, full surely his greatness is a—ripening, nips his root, and then he falls. By the first day of June, 1863, the Federals had abandoned all the territory of Western Virginia that they had acquired by their forward movement in the early spring, and even contracted their lines further back towards the Ohio River than they were at the close of the year of 1861, and by the 1st of September, 1862, General Loring occupied the Kanawha Valley, and General Jenkins passed through Western Virginia into the State of Ohio, and when winter closed in on the mountains of Virginia that year the outermost posts of the Federals were in Beverley, in Randolph county; Bulltown, in Braxton county; Summerville, in Nicholas county, and Fayetteville, in Fayette county; all of these places were fortified with ditches and parapets, and were well supplied with artillery, and the troops lived in block houses with portholes The Confederates occupied the entire Greenbr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
d that point. Col. Mayo some years since passed over the river. His surviving comrades will read with interest the story of their deeds from his pen. Very truly yours, Jno. W. Daniel. Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. The order of march into the enemy's country was left in front; first Ewell's, then Hill's, and, lastly, Longstreet's corps, of which Armistead's, Garnett's and Kemper's brigades of Pickett's Division, brought up the rear. The other two brigades, those of Corse and Jenkins, were absent on detached service. We reached Chambersburg early on the evening of June 27th, and stayed there until hastily summoned to the scene of hostilities on the morning of the 2d of July, having been employed in the meantime, in tearing up the railroad track and demolishing the depot and other buildings. A forced march of twentyfive miles brought us, at about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, to the stone bridge on the Cashtown and Gettysburg Turnpike, within cannon shot of the battle-fi
S. S., VI., 146, 162, 314. Jamestown,, U. S. S., VI., 119. Jamestown Island, Va., V., 306. Janes, H., I., 81. Jaques, Mr. I., 179. Jeff Daris,, C. S. S., VII., 29, 34. Jeffers, W. N., VI., 153, 165. Jefferson, T., I., 17; VII., 61. Jefferson, Tenn., II., 328; IV., 147. Jefferson Davis,, C. S. S. VI., 122. Jefferson Davis, horse of U. S. Grant, IV., 291. Jeffersonville, Ind., U. S. general hospital at, VII., 211, 215. Jenkins, A. G., III., 320; X., 317. Jenkins, C. T., VII., 135. Jenkins, D. C., IX., 158. Jenkins, M.: III., 46, 48, 49; X., 155. Jenkins Ferry, Ark., II., 352. Jennings, Bob, I., 179. Jericho Ford, Va., III., 71, 322. Jericho Mills, Va., pontoon bridge at, approaches to, V., 220. Jerome, signal officer receiving signals at Elk Mountain, Md. , VIII., 320, 321. Jesup, T. S., IX., 285. Jetersville, Va.; scouts ride to, III., 309; V., 268. Je
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
between White River and the St. Francis, and finally proceeded northward as far as the village of Wittsburg on the last-mentioned stream. But Marmaduke, going to meet him, soon compelled him to withdraw. The Federal troops, divided into two columns, came near being captured on the 11th of May. Having reached Taylor's Creek, Clayton succeeded at last in repulsing the attacks of the enemy, and was thus enabled to cover his movements under shelter of L'Anguille River, while on his right Colonel Jenkins held General Carter likewise in check at Mount Vernon, inflicting upon him a loss of about one hundred men. The expedition returned to Helena the following day. Thenceforth, all the efforts of the belligerents in Arkansas were concentrated around the latter post and that of Milliken's Bend: the great conflict which was raging around Vicksburg drew them toward the Mississippi. It is only beyond the western boundaries, in Indian Territory, that the war is still being prosecuted, but in
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
f connecting Winchester with Harper's Ferry. Jenkins was directed to precede Rodes in this movemenng Cumberland Valley completely deserted that Jenkins was pushing northward so rapidly. On the morade a movement on the 16th similar to that of Jenkins, and, occupying Cumberland on the 17th, had cfour brigades by the departure of Imboden and Jenkins, had been watching the Upper Rappahannock sin the battlefield. Stuart puts Chambliss' and Jenkins' brigades, which are with him, on the march aless soon discover the march of Chambliss and Jenkins. But this march is interrupted from the begio action the greater portion of his brigade. Jenkins' men are in position on his right, extending s occupied by Stuart. The greater portion of Jenkins' brigade, deployed as skirmishers like the Fear as possible from the enemy, only retaining Jenkins, who at the critical moment found himself in der Pettigrew and Davis, one of cavalry under Jenkins, and one made up of mixed troops under Imbode[13 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
agerstown by way of Leitersburg, Stuart, with Jenkins' brigade, takes a cross-road which leads him appearance of Stuart on his right flank with Jenkins' and Jones' brigades changes the aspect of thalong the great turnpike, while Robertson and Jenkins are endeavoring to turn it on the lift by wayth in front and in flank.--They are repulsed: Jenkins' troops are made to dismount for the purpose ind in this a great advantage. But presently Jenkins' brigade, coming from Downsville, crosses thened, commences an attack upon him. He orders Jenkins, who is at Martinsburg, to advance on the lefmorning in simple skirmishes in order to give Jenkins the necessary time to join him. About four o'clock, not seeing Jenkins appear, Lee makes his troops dismount in order to attack the Federals,, before attacking them again, the arrival of Jenkins. The latter at last makes his appearance, bu: he orders it to meet Averell with a part of Jenkins' force, while Jackson, who has remained with [3 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 6 (search)
s brigades, borrowed from Hill, have been added to it to form a division commanded by General Heth; Hill's division has been placed under General Pender; and Anderson's, taken from Longstreet, with the two preceding ones forms the Third corps, commanded by Hill. The First and Second corps have thus found themselves reduced to three divisions each. Longstreet has kept the first, and Ewell the second. From the 31st of May to the 1st of July the army has gained—1st, Pettigrew's brigade; 2d, Jenkins' and Imboden's; it has lost—1st, Corse's brigade and a regiment of Pettigrew's, left at Hanover Junction; 2d, three regiments of Early's division, left at Winchester. Army of Northern Virginia. Effective force May 31st. Present under arms.Total Present.Absent.Total. General staff and that of the army corps4747148 First corpsAnderson's division.7,4409,1594,51713,676 McLaws division7,3118,7364,06612,802 Hood's division7,7209,1483,43912,587 Pickett's division6,6877,9454,10512,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 7 (search)
abell, 4 batteries. 3d division, Major-general Pickett. 1st brigade, Kemper, 1st, 3d, 7th, 11th, 24th Va. 2d brigade Armistead, 9th, 14th, 38th, 53d, 57th Va. 3d brigade Garnett, 8th, 18th, 19th, 28th, 56th Va. (Brigades of Corse and Jenkins absent.) Artillery battalion, Major Dearing, 4 batteries. Corps artillery, Major Eschelmann, Washington Art., Alexander's Batt., 10 batteries. Second corps. Lieutenant-General Ewell. 1st division, Major-general J. Early. 1st brigavalry division. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. 1st brigade, Robertson, 4th, 5th, 59th, 63d N. C. 2d brigade W. Hampton, 1st N. C., 1st, 2d S. C., Cobb's, Davis', and Phillips' Legions. 3d brigade Fitzhugh Lee, 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th Va. 4th brigade W. H. F. Lee, 9th, 10th, 13th, 15th Va., 2d N C. 5th brigade Jones, 6th, 7th, 11th, 12th, 35th Batt. Va. 6th brigade Jenkins, 14th, 16th, 17th, 26th, 34th Batt. Va. Horse artillery, 7 batteries. Independent brigade, Imboden.
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the editor (search)
am E. Jones. 6th Virginia. 7th Virginia. 11th Virginia. 12th Virginia. 35th Virginia Battln. Robertson's brigade. relieved at his own request, August 4, 1863. Brig.-gen. B. H. Robertson. 4th North Carolina. 5th North Carolina. Jenkins' brigade. Brig.-gen. A. G. Jenkins. 14th Virginia. 16th Virginia. 17th Virginia. 34th Virginia Battln. 36th Virginia Battln. W. H. F. Lee's brigade. Colonel J. R. Chambliss. 2d North Carolina. 9th Virginia. 10th Virginia. 13tBrig.-gen. A. G. Jenkins. 14th Virginia. 16th Virginia. 17th Virginia. 34th Virginia Battln. 36th Virginia Battln. W. H. F. Lee's brigade. Colonel J. R. Chambliss. 2d North Carolina. 9th Virginia. 10th Virginia. 13th Virginia. 15th Virginia. Not Brigaded (?). Imboden's Command. 43d Virginia (Mosby's) Battalion. Stuart Horse Artillery. Captain Thomas E. Jackson's battery appears on return for July 31, 1863, as in the cavalry division, but it is not mentioned in reports of the campaign. Major R. F. Beckham. Breathed's Maryland Battery. Chew's Virginia Battery. Griffin's 2d Maryland Battery. Hart's South Carolina Bat. (Washington Art.). McGregor's Virginia Battery. Moorman's
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