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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 116 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 7 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for M. Jenkins or search for M. Jenkins in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
dquarters at Manassas Junction. He had been preceded by General Bonham, then a Confederate brigadier, with the regiments of Colonels Gregg, Kershaw, Bacon, Cash, Jenkins and Sloan—First, Second, Seventh, Eighth, Fifth and Fourth South Carolina volunteers. Before General Beauregard's arrival in Virginia, General Bonham with his des, the First commanded by Bonham, composed of the regiments of Gregg, Kershaw, Bacon and Cash. Sloan's regiment was assigned to the Sixth brigade, Early's; and Jenkins' Regiment to the Third, Gen. D. R. Jones. Col. N. G. Evans, an officer of the old United States army, having arrived at Manassas, was assigned to command of a Seven other cavalry companies were distributed among the other brigades. Bonham's position was behind Mitchell's ford, with his four regiments of Carolinians; Jenkins' Fifth regiment was with General Jones' brigade, behind McLean's ford, and Sloan's Fourth regiment was with Evans' brigade on the left, at the stone bridge. With
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
nd sergeant, and at the reorganization became first lieutenant of Company G, Palmetto sharpshooters. At the battle of Seven Pines his captain was badly wounded, and he was promoted to that rank. In this battle his company lost 35 men killed and wounded out of 65 who entered the battle. And at the battle of Frayser's Farm his company lost 66 2/3 per cent. of the regiment. Subsequently he commanded the company throughout the war. His military record is that of his gallant regiment and of Jenkins' brigade. He took part in the Chickahominy campaign, the battles of Boonsboro and Sharpsburg in Maryland, and Fredericksburg, was then on duty in southern Virginia, and in the fall of 1863 went with Longstreet to Georgia and Tennessee, fighting in the Knoxville campaign and suffering the terrible privations of the winter which followed. Then in Virginia again he fought at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania Court House, and from there to Cold Harbor. After taking part in the battle of Peter