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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 237 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 69 7 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 50 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 35 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Micah Jenkins or search for Micah Jenkins in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ectively from 1 to 10, inclusive, and commanded by Cols. Johnson Hagood, J. B. Kershaw, J. H. Williams, J. B. E. Sloan, M. Jenkins, J. H. Rion, T. G. Bacon, E. B. Cash, J. D. Blanding, and A. M. Manigault. The brigadier-generals appointed by the he Fourth, Col. J. B. E. Sloan; the Eighth, Col. E. B. Cash; the Legion infantry, Col. Wade Hampton, and the Fifth, Col. Micah Jenkins. The latter regiment was not engaged in the great battle, but, under orders, crossed Bull run and attacked the strong force in front of McLean's ford. The regiment was wholly unsupported and was forced to withdraw, Colonel Jenkins rightly deeming an assault, under the circumstances, needless. The following enumeration of losses is taken from the several repin the War Records, Vol. II, p. 570: Kershaw's regiment, 5 killed, 43 wounded; Sloan's regiment, 11 killed, 79 wounded; Jenkins' regiment, 3 killed, 23 wounded; Cash's regiment, 5 killed, 23 wounded; Hampton's legion, 19 killed, 102 wounded; total,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
fective operations. General Hill ordered Colonel Jenkins, with the Palmetto sharpshooters and the r Mattison and Colonel Giles, on the right of Jenkins and on the immediate left of Hill's attackings troops were beaten. Reaching the railroad, Jenkins halted and dressed his line, the Twenty-sevenleft in the general attack, sent the Fifth to Jenkins, under Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson, the gallant Co, Colonel Bratton being wounded) on the left, Jenkins boldly advanced to meet his foe. The two commlarge. Speaking generally of his losses, Colonel Jenkins says: In my two color companies, out of 8ll that they gained. Gregg, on the left, and Jenkins, in the center, bore their full share of the o report from either R. H. Anderson, Gregg or Jenkins. Longstreet specially mentions Anderson, JenJenkins and Captain Kilpatrick of the Palmetto sharpshooters in his report, for distinguished conduct.the heaviest loss falling on the Fourteenth. Jenkins lost over 450, 234 of these from the Sharpsho[20 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
teries; Anderson's old brigade, under Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins, with Corse's and Hunton's Virginia b Kemper, with two brigades in his front line, Jenkins and Hunter, supported by Corse; then D. R. Jotion of Warrenton. The brigades of Evans and Jenkins were composed of South Carolina troops; the Fon, and many other gallant spirits. Brigadier-General Jenkins was wounded at the head of his briga regretted that there are no reports from General Jenkins of record, or any one of his regimental corting Hood, came into battle connection with Jenkins. This was particularly the case when the gunin his report gives the line of program which Jenkins observed, as passing beyond the Chinn house a of the theater of battle for the brigades of Jenkins and Evans and the Hampton legion infantry, unelfth, 145; Thirteenth, 144; Fourteenth, 65. Jenkins' brigade— First (Hagood's), 124; Second Rifletenant Youngblood of the Fourteenth, and Lieutenant Jenkins of the Rifles, were wounded. We call [1 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
in Maryland, were the brigades of N. G. Evans, Kershaw and Jenkins under Col. Joseph Walker; the Fifteenth regiment, Colonel h Longstreet were the South Carolina brigades of Evans and Jenkins, the Fifteenth South Carolina with Drayton, and the Hamptoades under Generals Kemper and Garnett and Colonel Walker (Jenkins') returned from their march down the mountain and reached Col. Joseph Walker, Palmetto sharpshooters, commanding Jenkins' brigade, reported his force only partially engaged. Much, the Second rifles marching as rear guard. The losses in Jenkins' brigade were comparatively light, 3 killed and 29 woundedn our front having retired, and Colonel Walker, commanding Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, on our right, having sent to me f troops threw their masses against D. R. Jones' division. Jenkins' brigade under Colonel Walker was on the left of Jones' diharpshooters, were wounded. To that part of the action of Jenkins' brigade in which it was turned by Walker to deliver its f
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
and McLaws. In this disposition of the troops the South Carolina commands were posted as follows: Gregg's brigade on the right, as has been noted; McIntosh's battery, with Lieut.-Col. R. L. Walker's guns, on the extreme right of A. P. Hill; Jenkins' brigade with Pickett's division; Bachman's and Garden's batteries on Hood's line; Rhett's battery in Alexander's battalion; Kershaw's brigade in McLaws' line, with the left of the brigade resting on Hazel run. The brigade of Gen. N. G. Evans, The name and death of Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb will forever be associated with this heroic defense, and the honor and glory of sustaining the position which he held against such odds, will be the lasting possession of Kershaw and his brigade. Jenkins' brigade, though under artillery fire and suffering the loss of 8 men, was but slightly engaged; Bachman's and Garden's batteries did effective service against the flank of the Federal attack on the extreme right. The rifle battery of Captain R
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
First corps were the batteries of Capt. Hugh R. Garden (Palmetto) and Captain Bachman's German artillery, with Hood's division, and the Brooks (Rhett's) battery, Lieut. S. C. Gilbert, in Alexander's battalion of Walton's reserve artillery. Gen. Micah Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, of Pickett's division, Longstreet's corps, was detached for special duty on the Blackwater, in southeast Virginia, under Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill. In the Third army corps (A. P. Hill's), South Carolina was representeds decided. While it was in progress General Stuart, on the rear of General Lee's left, was fighting a great cavalry battle with the main body of General Meade's cavalry. Stuart had the brigades of Hampton, Fitz Lee, Chambliss, W. H. F. Lee and Jenkins. In the battle much of the fighting was at close quarters and with pistol and saber as the charging lines came together. In one of these contacts General Hampton was twice severely wounded. On the day previous, his having been the first of Ge
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ttles of the 19th and 20th of September were now imminent. We give the organization of the two armies as they were engaged in that memorable conflict, omitting those troops which were not in the battle; as, for instance, the brigades of Hood's and Mc-Laws' divisions, and the artillery of those commands. Longstreet had only three brigades in battle on the 19th and five on the 20th, the artillery and other commands of his corps not having arrived. Among his absent brigades was that of Gen. Micah Jenkins, composed of South Carolina regiments. Bragg's army. Right wing, Lieutenant-General Polk commanding. Hill's corps, Lieut.-Gen. D. H. Hill: Cheatham's division, 5 brigades, 5 batteries; Cleburne's division, 3 brigades. 3 batteries; Breckinridge's division, 3 brigades, 4 batteries Walker's corps, Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker: Walker's division, 3 brigades, 2 batteries; Liddell's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Total of wing, 5 divisions, 16 brigades, 16 batteries. L
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
icah Jenkins, and Col. John Bratton commanded Jenkins' brigade, which joined Longstreet after Chicknooga. On Longstreet's part Law's brigade of Jenkins' division was moved down the river below Lookforce in line of battle, when he notified General Jenkins, and was ordered to go as far as possible General Geary's division was attacked by Jenkins' South Carolina brigade. No other troops fir with the divisions of McLaws and Hood (under Jenkins), including the South Carolina brigades of JeCapt. B. M. Whitener the Third battalion. General Jenkins was in command of his brigade, in the divand directed an attack to be made by Brigadier-General Jenkins and myself upon the position of the the right of the road toward Fredericksburg. Jenkins' brigade was put in motion in the plank road,n in the woods to the right. I rode with General Jenkins at the head of his command, arranging wit On the same day General Bratton's brigade (Jenkins') was in battle on the Brock road, on the rig[9 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
. He commanded his regiment with gallantry in Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet's corps, at Williamsburg where he was in command of the brigade while Jenkins had charge of Hood's division. After the death of Jenkins at the battle of the Wilderness, he was at once promoted brigadier-general on the urgrigadier-General Micah Jenkins Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins was born on Edisto island in 1839ared that he hoped to hold every man in it if Jenkins could be promoted brigadiergen-eral. Besidesnt to the assistance of Bragg at Chattanooga, Jenkins' brigade was transferred to Hood's division, Field was now in charge of the division, and Jenkins led his famous old brigade to battle on May 6 Va., he had command of a brigade composed of Jenkins' Fifth South Carolina and Burt's Eighteenth a Kemper's and Garnett's Virginia brigades and Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, had a conspicuous pahis works. He was riding with Longstreet and Jenkins when these two generals were wounded, and for[4 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
eaching Virginia he was made quartermaster of Jenkins' brigade with the rank of major. Having a mi fort, but could not hold it without help, as Jenkins' regiment was utterly cut to pieces. The queHe was in Longstreet's corps at Suffolk, with Jenkins' brigade on the Blackwater, and in front of R to Virginia. During the Georgia campaign of Jenkins' brigade, he was dangerously wounded while aswn as the Palmetto sharpshooters, of which Micah Jenkins was colonel, and Captain Foster commander earer for his regiment, which was Moore's, of Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet's corps, Field's divisiogovernment. In the recent war with Spain, Micah Jenkins, the surviving son, volunteered in the Uni legion infantry, Col. M. W. Gary commanding, Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet's corps, army of Norther regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Micah Jenkins, and after the latter was wounded, Colonsubsequently transferred to the staff of Gen. Micah Jenkins, with whom he served in Longstreet's cor[25 more...]