hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 237 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 69 7 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 50 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 35 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Micah Jenkins or search for Micah Jenkins in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How General A. P. Hill met his fate. (search)
quarters at the Turnbull House, on the Cox road. From there, accompanied only by two soldiers (Sergeant Tucker and Private Jenkins), he started to the right of his lines, his troops had been swept away from their line of defense, and that there wa's. We had gone a little more than half this distance, when we suddenly came upon two of the enemy's armed infantry men. Jenkins and myself, who up to this time rode immediately behind the General, were instantly upon them, when, at the command surrender, they laid down their arms. Turning to the General, I asked what should be done with the prisoners. He said, Jenkins, take them to General Lee. Jenkins started back with his men, and we rode on. Though not invited, I was at the General'sJenkins started back with his men, and we rode on. Though not invited, I was at the General's side, and my attention now having been aroused, and looking carefully ahead and around, I saw a lot of people in and about the old log hut winter quarters of General Mahone's division, situated to the right of Whitworth house and on the top of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
dix G, pp. 121-4. Charles Seton Fleming, the son of Colonel Lewis Fleming, a planter of Florida, of gentle Irish descent, was born near Jacksonville, February 9, 1839; educated in local private school, and in youth found employment in a mercantile house in Chicago, Ill. He evinced at an early age a preference for the profession of arms, and early in the year 1858, entered as a cadet King's Mountain Military School at Yorkville, South Carolina, the principal of which institution was Major Micah Jenkins, who afterward served with distinction as a General in the C. S. Army, and fell a martyr to the Lost cause on the bloody field of the Wilderness on the 5th of May, 1864. Young Fleming attended this school until June, 1859. After serving for a time as the purser on a river steamer, he entered, in July, 1860, upon the study of law, in the office of his brother, Louis J. Fleming, in Jacksonville, Florida. In consonance with his instincts he was also a member of a local military comp