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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 116 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 7 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. Jenkins or search for M. Jenkins in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
pi. Bryan's brigade. did not arrive in time to take part in the battle. Jenkins's brigade assigned to the division September 11th, 1863. Brigadier-General od's division. Major-General John B. Hood. Brigadier-General E. M. Law. Jenkins's brigade. did not arrive in time to take part in the battle. Jenkins's brJenkins's brigade assigned to the division September 11th, 1863. Brigadier-General M. Jenkins. First South Carolina. Second South Carolina Rifles. Fifth South Carolina. SBrigadier-General M. Jenkins. First South Carolina. Second South Carolina Rifles. Fifth South Carolina. Sixth South Carolina. Hampton Legion. Palmetto Sharpshooters. Law's brigade. Brigadier-General E. M. Law—Colonel J. L. Sheffield. Fourth Alabama. Fifte Anderson's brigade. did not arrive in time to take part in the battle. Jenkins's brigade assigned to the division September 11, 1863. Brigadier-General Gell. Corps Artillery. did not arrive in time to take part in the battle. Jenkins's brigade assigned to the division September 11, 1863. Colonel E. Porter Al
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Further details of the death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
s a copse of small pines, with a few large ones interspersed. It was in this copse, doubtless, that General Hill met his death in the manner described by Tucker. The mistakes of Tucker are first as to the distance of the branch in question from the Turnbull House, which is not more than 200 (two hundred) yards, and then as to the time of his conversation with General Hill which must have been after I left him, and some distance up the branch. I remember Tucker's presence but not that of Jenkins at the branch. When we left the gate of the Turnbull House General Hill had but one courier; but another could have easily ridden up behind us without attracting my attention, while we were examining the front so intently in the dim light of the coming day. The sad event of General Hill's death was the crowning sorrow of that fatal morning. In him fell one of the knightliest Generals of that army of knightly soldiers. On the field he was the very soul of chivalrous gallantry. In mome
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from General Lee to President Davis on the situation in September, 1863. (search)
ry and that he took a considerable number of prisoners. He left a picket force in front of the enemy at Cedar Mountain, and I have heard nothing from him this morning. It may be a reconnoissance in force merely, but I have made preparations in case it should be an advance of his whole force. I have been informed that the New York Herald of the 9th instant contained the movement of Longstreet's corps in the order in which his divisions moved, and even contains the announcement that two of his brigades would probably stop in Richmond and Wise and Jenkins take their places. I only communicated the movement to the Quartermaster-General on the night of the 6th instant, and it must have reached New York on the 7th or 8th in order to be in the Herald of the 9th. I fear there has been great imprudence in talking on the part of our people, or that there may be improper persons among the officers or railroad clerks. I am, with great respect, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain Francis Huger Harleston. (search)
s, rather than neglect their duty to us and to the State. The University of North Carolina has erected a Memorial Hall, and dedicated it to the memory of her sons who have died in the honorable fulfilment of their responsibilities, whatever their callings in life! Fellow-graduates, ex-cadets, and cadets of the South Carolina Military Academy, citizens of Old Charleston, yes, Carolinians all, shall we not write on these walls, in Parian marble, the names of Tew, and Gendron Palmer, and Jenkins, and Charley Haskell, and Jim Nance, and McCreary, and Randall Craft, and Mason Smith, and Datterer, and the other honored names of the gallant men who died in the service of their country. If he had been spared to his friends and his State, no one of us could take a heartier interest in the discharge of this sacred duty than the brave soldier whose name we have inscribed on this beautiful tablet. My friends, there is a deeper lesson for us and our children in these memorials to our d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
Federal left, nor the First corps on the right, made much progress. By four in the afternoon Longstreet came up with the brigades of Evans, Pickett, Kemper, and Jenkins which he placed on the left, and Hood, Whiting, Drayton, and D. R. Jones which he posted on the right. But the men were exhausted by a forced march of twelve or an a mile and a half from the only road to Virginia, accessible to Lee for reinforcement or retreat. In front of him was Toombs, with three Georgia regiments and Jenkins's brigade. From his position he could see every movement of the Confederates, and each detail of the struggle on the left. Between 9 and 10 o'clock he attempted Sharpsburgh. The Fifteenth South Carolina, Colonel De Saussure, clung to some strong stone houses on the edge of the town, where he held back Wilcox's advance. Jenkins followed Drayton, and Pickett and Evans were then ordered back by Jones. The battle was lost, for Burnside was within two hundred yards of Lee's only line of