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Could not Punish her. --John T. Hicks, who keeps a shoe store on Cary street, again had Mrs. Elizabeth Jeter before the Mayor on the charge of being a person of evil fame and reputation, and for fusing violent and obscene language towards him. Hicks's witnesses failed to substantiate the charge, while the Mayor's police, who had been sent to ascertain the character of Mrs. Jeter's house, testified to her proper department and satisfied His Honor that she was not a nuisance to the neighborsene language towards him. Hicks's witnesses failed to substantiate the charge, while the Mayor's police, who had been sent to ascertain the character of Mrs. Jeter's house, testified to her proper department and satisfied His Honor that she was not a nuisance to the neighbors. Her discharge was received with great satisfaction, and Mrs. J., who had an interesting babe in her arms, assured the Mayor that in future she would avoid such unpleasant predicaments as she had just been released from.
street, was discharged with an admonition, upon a promise to "go, and sin no more." Albert Simmonds, a friend of the above, charged with interfering with the watchmen in the discharge of their duty, and attempting to prevent the arrest of John H. Emberton, was sent to the Provost-Marshal, to be by him forwarded to his command. The cases of William Bass, free negro, charged with receiving four ambulance springs, knowing the same to have been stolen from the Confederate States; Elizabeth Jeter, charged with threatening to assault and beat Ellen Mitchell, as well as to poison her son; Albert Groomes, charged with felony, and Henrietta, slave of Thomas Friend, charged with forging passports, were called; but, owing to the absence of witnesses, were continued for a future hearing. Edwin, slave of Joseph Dowdey, charged with stealing a coat, valued at six hundred dollars, the property of Joseph Kemper, was ordered to receive thirty-nine lashes. Twenty stripes were inflicted
e States a disabled military officer, not below the rank of first lieutenant, who shall have the entire control and supervision of the hospital. On motion, the bill was placed on the calendar and ordered to be printed. House bill to authorize the First Auditor to receive and keep the accounts of the Navy Department was considered and passed. The Senate resolved into secret legislative session. House of Representatives. The House met at the usual hour.--Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Jeter. Under the call of committees, the Committee on Military Affairs reported a bill to allow the pay due to officers and privates, prisoners of war in the hands of the enemy, to be paid to the wives of such soldiers. Passed. The House, upon the recommendation of the Military Committee, disagreed to the Senate amendments to the House bill to diminish the number of exemptions, and tendered a conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses. The Committee also reported a bill
kenness and lying in the street, was ordered to be taken to the Provost-Marshal, to be by him sent to his command. Ramos, slave of Christopher Hatcher, charged with stealing wood from the city, was ordered to receive thirty-nine lashes. The case of William Bass, free negro, charged with receiving four ambulance springs, belonging to the Confederate States, knowing the same to have been stolen, was called up, but, owing to the absence of testimony, was further continued. Mrs. Elizabeth Jeter, against whom a charge was instituted by Ellen Mitchell that the accused had threatened to assault and beat her, and to poison her son, was discharged upon the promise given by her that she will not further molest said Ellen Mitchell. Owing to the fact that the Mayor has partially heard the following cases, and that the Recorder does not desire to dispose of them during his absence, they were continued till such time as His Honor may be able to attend court: Delia Mack, and Richa
The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
continued indisposition of the Mayor. We append the following summary: James R. Moore, charged with buying eggs at the First Market to sell again, was fined fifty dollars and ordered to surrender his purchase for confiscation. Edward Hudson, a free negro, was charged with having five hundred feet of plank in his possession, knowing it to have been stolen. The accused established his innocence and was discharged. Twenty dollars fine was imposed upon Elisha Jackson, charged with violating a city ordinance by offering goods, wares and merchandise for sale on the sidewalk on Main street. Jennie Howard was summoned to show cause why she should not be fined for permitting her servant to go at large; but, for satisfactory reasons, her case was continued. Complaint was made against Ellen Mitchell for an alleged attempt to break into the house of Elizabeth Jeter with the intention of stealing her furniture and clothing. The case was continued till the 3d instant.
s, soap and snuff, valued at three hundred dollars, the property of G. A. Peple, was ordered to be whipped. James Denay, charged with being a person of evil name, fame and reputation, was committed in default of security for his good behavior. George, slave of Fanny West, and James, slave of Wilson Kelly, charged with engaging in pugilistic exercise in the house of Fanny West, were ordered to be soundly whipped. The case of Freeman Powell, charged with stabbing and wounding Patrick O'Donnell, was continued. The case against Ellen Mitchell and Elizabeth Swords, charged with burglariously entering the house of Elizabeth Jeter, was again called, but decision deferred for satisfactory reasons. John Ryan, white, was charged with stealing a five barrel pistol, the property of C. L. Harless; but circumstances prevented the final disposition of the case. The finding of one or two other parties, charged with ordinance violations, concluded the day's proceedings.
rticles of value belonging to Anna Johnson, was ordered thirty-nine lashes. Louisa, slave John H. Thompson, was charged with assaulting and beating George W. Clutter, a white boy, and was ordered ten lashes. Dennis Leary, charged with receiving a lot of zinc, copper, brass, etc., from some person unknown, had a hearing, and was sent on to the Hustings Court. Dick, slave of Richard T. Allen, charged with stealing two bags of flour from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. Sallie Swords was up for stealing clothing from Elizabeth Jeter, but her case was further continued. Hester, slave of Susan Jarvis, charged with burglariously breaking and entering a dwelling, and stealing therefrom a lot of crockery ware, spoons and cutlery to the value of one hundred dollars, was "set back." The case of Mary and Harriet, slaves of James M. Talbott, and Richard, slave of Mary Redmond, charged with stealing money from James M. Talbott, was further continued.