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Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 31 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 18 18 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 17 13 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 16 12 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 15 15 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 14 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 13 13 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for John or search for John in all documents.

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ed without loss of life. At High Bridge (April 6) the 10th Battery had no loss, but the 4th Cavalry (Col. Francis Washburn), with a force of only 12 officers and 67 men, was surrounded by the Confederate cavalry, under Generals Rosser and Fitzhugh Lee, and, after once cutting their way through, returned to the defence of two infantry regiments which had accompanied them. Gen. Theodore Reed, commanding the expedition, was killed, and Colonel Washburn mortally wounded, Capts. W. T. Hodges and John D. B. Goddard, with First Lieut. George F. Davis, being also killed, and most of the men killed, wounded or captured. The results of the contest were, however, of great importance in checking the Confederates and leading to Lee's final surrender. Meanwhile, on April 3, Cos. E and H, 1st Mass. Cavalry, under Maj. A. H. Stevens, Jr., were the first troops to enter Richmond on the day of its evacuation; Major Stevens having received the surrender of the city and personally hoisting the guidons