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Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 31 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 18 18 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 17 13 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 16 12 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 15 15 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 14 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 13 13 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John or search for John in all documents.

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ued nearly to New Creek. On October 22d, General Kelley was assigned to command of the Federal department of Harper's Ferry and Cumberland. On the 25th he massed a still more formidable force at New Creek, and marched against Romney, while Colonel John's Maryland cavalry regiment moved from Patterson's creek to strike the Confederates in the rear. Passing Mechanicsburg Gap without resistance, they found the Confederates on the 26th in position on the cemetery hill at the town, where the litonald's command retired, withdrawing their artillery and making another stand east of town, from which they were again compelled to retreat. General Kelley reported the capture of artillery and baggage train and small-arms, but no prisoners. Colonel John's cavalry, mentioned above, was met at South Branch bridge, near Springfield, by Colonel Monroe, and defeated with considerable loss. A Federal force was stationed at Romney, while Colonel Monroe encamped 15 miles east, at the town of Hanging
ing a brigade in battle. The Thirty-first infantry was organized at the same time, with the following companies: A, of Marion county, Capt. W. W. Arnett, afterward lieutenant-colonel Twentieth cavalry, succeeded by Capt. W. P. Thompson, promoted to colonel Nineteenth cavalry; B, of Highland county; C, of Harrison county, Capt. U. M. Turner, Lieuts. W. P. Cooper, Norval Lewis; D, of Gilmer county, Capt. J. S. K. McCutcheon, afterward lieutenant-colonel and wounded at Cedar Mountain, and Lieut. John Campbell; E, of Highland county; F, of Randolph county, Captain Harding; G, of Pocahontas county; H, of Barbour county, Capt. Thomas Bradford, Lieut. I. V. Johnson; I, of Lewis county, Capt. Alfred Jackson, of Weston, afterward lieutenant-colonel and wounded at Cedar Mountain, Lieut. Nathan Clawson. Col. William L. Jackson was the first in command, and early in 1862 was succeeded by John S. Hoffman, of Clarksburg. John G. Gittings, adjutant of the regiment two and a half years, was afte