Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Andy Johnson or search for Andy Johnson in all documents.

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Mr. Jones, of Tenn, moved to amend by inserting at the end of the resolution the words, "and that the committee report at the next session."--This amendment was accepted, and, as amended, the resolution was agreed to. Mr. Jones, of Tenn., moved to suspend the call of the States, and that the committees be called. The motion prevailed, and the Committee on Elections being called, Mr. Smith, of N. C. submitted a report in the contested election case between Messrs. Garland and Johnson, of Ark, which he asked might be printed. Mr. Crockett, from the same committee, submitted a minority report, for which he asked the same disposition. Both reports were ordered to be printed. The morning hour having expired, the special order, the bill from the Military Committee, to increase the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, was taken up; the question, as announced by the Chair, being upon the amendment of Mr. Chrisman, of Ky. This amendment, which comes in af
Don Carlos Buell, commander of the Yankee army of the West, and Andy Johnson, Lincoln's Provisional Governor of Tennessee. The quarrel grew it was impossible for him to hold Nashville and subsist his army. Johnson replied that, not withstanding the reasons alleged by Buell, the pay out of the city. Buell rejoined by stating that he would cause Johnson to he shot if he dared destroy the Capital. Whereupon Johnson remJohnson remarked that Buell was a d — d scoundrel. This was an insult that the Federal General felt himself bound to resent, which he did by knocking JJohnson down, jumping upon him, and giving him a very sound beating. Johnson's face is said to have been very badly bruised. At last accountJohnson's face is said to have been very badly bruised. At last accounts Johnson had fled the place, and Buell endeavored to follow the Governor's example, but finding that Geo. Bragg was too quick for him, and hJohnson had fled the place, and Buell endeavored to follow the Governor's example, but finding that Geo. Bragg was too quick for him, and had placed his powerful army between the Cumberland and Gallatin, retraced his steps and re-entered Nashville. Here he will probably remain u