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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
s colony's government from London to New England......August, 1629 John Winthrop chosen governor and Thomas Dudley lieutenant-governor of the Massachusetts colony......Aug. 20, 1629 Governor Winthrop, with Isaac Johnson and his wife, Lady Arbella Johnson, daughter of the Earl of Lincoln, sail from England in the Arbella for Massachusetts......April 8, 1630 Vessel arrives at Salem......June 12, 1630 Lady Arbella Johnson died......Aug. 30, 1630 Her husband, Isaac Johnson, died......Lady Arbella Johnson died......Aug. 30, 1630 Her husband, Isaac Johnson, died......Sept. 30, 1630 First general court met at Boston......Oct. 19, 1630 Seventeen ships, bringing about 1,500 emigrants, arrive in Massachusetts Bay and at Plymouth during the year ......1630 First church at Boston, third in order of time in the colony, gathered at Charlestown......July, 1630 Watertown settled by Sir Richard Saltonstall......1630 Roxbury settled by William Pynchon......1630 Newtown (now Cambridge) settled by Mr. Dudley, Mr. Bradstreet, and others......1630 Dorch
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 15 (search)
ns which were in the way of our ordnance; and out of every ship were thrown such bed-matters as were subject to take fire; and we heaved out our long-boats, and put up our waist-cloths, To protect the sides of the vessel. and drew forth our men, and armed them with muskets and other weapons, and instruments for fireworks; and, for an experiment, our captain shot a ball of wildfire, fastened to an arrow, out of a crossbow, which burnt in the water a good time. The Lady Arbella Lady Arbella Johnson, daughter of the Earl of Lincoln, and wife of Isaac Johnson, to whom the settlement of Boston was chiefly due. She died soon after her arrival. and the other women and children were removed into the lower deck, that they might be out of danger. All things being thus fitted, we went to prayer upon the upper deck. It was much to see how cheerful and comfortable all the company appeared. Not a woman or child that showed fear, though all did apprehend the danger to have been great, if
s, Capt., William, 58 n. 1 (see next name). Jenison, Ensign, William, 41; autograph, 41 n. 3; one of the three first selectmen, 34. Jewell (the) arrives at Salem, 13. Jewels, watch, how made, 136; delicate measurement of, 137. Johnson, Lady, Arbella, death of, 16. Johnson, Mr., death of, 16. Kendall: Jonas B., Josiah S., 79. Kendall's grist-mill, 79, 124. Kimball, Henry, dwelling of, 85. Kimball Tavern, 86-7, 110. King Phillip's War begun, 60-62. King's colors mutiJohnson, Mr., death of, 16. Kendall: Jonas B., Josiah S., 79. Kendall's grist-mill, 79, 124. Kimball, Henry, dwelling of, 85. Kimball Tavern, 86-7, 110. King Phillip's War begun, 60-62. King's colors mutilated, 25, 41 n. 4. King's common. 50. Knowles, Rev., John, ordained associate pastor, 46; went to Virginia and returned, 46; returns to England, 48. Laborers, scarcity of, 31. Lancaster, first settlement at, 47 n. 3; attacked by Indians, 60; second attack, 61. Land Bank Co., 94. Land in Great Dividends allotted, 53. Lawrence: Geo. sen., lands of, 70, 79; Jacob, Leonard, 117. Leagues. three up Charles River, 15. Levy by General Court, 100. Levy for palisade at Newtow
ds weekly, yea, almost daily, drop away before their eyes; in a country abounding in secret fountains they had pined for the want of good water. Many of them had been accustomed to plenty and ease, the refinements and the conveniencies of luxury. Woman was there to struggle against unforeseen hardships, unwonted sorrows; the men, who defied trials for themselves, were miserable at beholding those whom they cherished dismayed by the horrors which encompassed them. The virtues of the lady Arbella Johnson could not break through the gloom; and as she had been ill before her arrival, grief hurried her to the grave. Her husband, a wise and holy man, in life the greatest furtherer of the plantation, and by his bequests a large benefactor of the infant state, sank under disease and afflictions; but he died willingly and in sweet peace, making a most godly end. Winthrop lost a son, who left a widow and children in England. A hundred or more, some of them of the board of assistants, men w