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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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on the ground, among the Washington visitors. This may be wholly absurd and untrue; but how easily such a thing could have been done! My loyal Washington friend's suggestion of the good moral effect which our Seventh Regiment would produce by their return to the capital while people's minds were thus disturbed, was duly noted. As the cars were to leave at two, and our flags now waved over both wings of the noble Capitol, I had the curiosity to take a turn in the Senate, where gallant Audy Johnson had promised to speak on the bill approving the doings of the President. About thirty Senators were present, looking as calm as if the battle of New Orleans had been the last on the continent. The scene here was a notable afterpiece to the drama of yesterday. Breckinridge sat at his desk, reading in a morning paper the news of our disaster. Could one mistake which was lie? or misinterpret his expression of entire satisfaction with what he is reading? Is he naturally so cool and so
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
on the ground, among the Washington visitors. This may be wholly absurd and untrue; but how easily such a thing could have been done! My loyal Washington friend's suggestion of the good moral effect which our Seventh Regiment would produce by their return to the capital while people's minds were thus disturbed, was duly noted. As the cars were to leave at two, and our flags now waved over both wings of the noble Capitol, I had the curiosity to take a turn in the Senate, where gallant Audy Johnson had promised to speak on the bill approving the doings of the President. About thirty Senators were present, looking as calm as if the battle of New Orleans had been the last on the continent. The scene here was a notable afterpiece to the drama of yesterday. Breckinridge sat at his desk, reading in a morning paper the news of our disaster. Could one mistake which was lie? or misinterpret his expression of entire satisfaction with what he is reading? Is he naturally so cool and so