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d; the Fourteenth, Lieut.-Col. Pleasant Fowler; the Fifteenth, Col. Ben Johnson; the Seventeenth, Col. John Griffith; the Eighteenth, Col, R. ams, captain of Company A. The officers were sent as prisoners to Johnson's island, except Capt. Daniel Boone, Lieut. J. G. Crump and Williathe Big Black and, with the other officers, was sent a prisoner to Johnson's island. Colonel Cravens became circuit judge and representativeptain Arbuckle after the latter was captured at Port Hudson. From Johnson's island they were transferred to Fort Delaware, after being sent with all the other officers at Johnson's island to Point Lookout, Md., and detained several months after the surrender of Lee. The Eighteeugh the siege of forty-eight days. The officers were imprisoned on Johnson's island, and the privates were paroled as prisoners of war untilShaver, Crockett, Marmaduke, Provence, John C. Wright, Slemons, B. W. Johnson, Gaither. Maj.-Gen. T. C. Hindman, after being relieved of t
J. E. Cravens. Brigaded with these were some Missouri dismounted cavalry and two batteries. Capt. W. N. Hogg's Appeal battery was with Hebert's brigade, Capt. Francis McNally's battery was unattached, the batteries of Capts; J. A. Owens and J. C. Thrall were with General Ruggles' command. At Port Hudson, La., was the Arkansas brigade of Gen. W. N. R. Beall, composed of the Eleventh regiment, Col. John L. Logan; Twelfth, Col. T. J. Reid, Jr.; Fourteenth, Col. F. P. Powers; Fifteenth, Col. B. W. Johnson; Sixteenth, Col. David Provence; Seventeenth (State), Col. John Griffith; Eighteenth, Col. R. H. Crockett; Twenty-third, Col. O. P. Lyles; First battalion, Lieut.-Col. Batt. Jones. In the same district then, but soon transferred to Jackson, were the Ninth Arkansas, Col. I. L. Dunlop, in General Rust's brigade, and the Tenth Arkansas, Col. A. R. Witt, in General Buford's brigade. When General Grant landed south of Vicksburg, among the first to oppose him were the Arkansans of Green
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
f Branch, Sam Blankenship, J. H. Brooks, * Tucker Cocke, *R. E. Clough, * Henry Childress, J. E. Crouch, Milton Cragwall, * Otho Carter, *W. E. Clark, *Dr. Duval, Pryor Drumwright, * Tom Dunn, * Henry Davenport, *Joe Drinker, * Napoleon Elliott, *Tom Eads, Bill Farmer, *George Fisher, *J. B. Gathright, *J. R. Gathright, * Peter Guerrant, * Marcellus Gentry, *Oscar Gilliam, T. G. Holman, F. O. Harris, Jim Hughes, * Frank Hall, Ben Johnson, * Hawton Johnson, G. G. Johnson, * George Kasee, * George Lane, *Josiah Leake, Henry Leadbetter, G. J. Loyall, *Parson Loyall, * Pat Loving, Rat Long, W. C. Malone, Tom Amos, Julian Branch, J. H. Bowles, * J. C. Bowden, Ed. Clough, J. H. Childress, * Luther Childress, W. M. Crouch, * George Cardwell, Robert Clements, W. E. Dennis, J. D. Drumwright, J. H. Dickerson, * William Davenport, J. E. Dugings, William Edwards, *Daniel Eads,
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23., Turnpikes Past and present. (search)
In a press notice of Turnpikes of New England, its writer quotes rare Ben Johnson as saying: I turn up my axle like a turnpike. Having in his boyhood s produced, the present writer can claim a slight acquaintance. But as rare Ben Johnson lived and flourished in the sixteenth century, there is no one in Medford whon which a toll is paid for the privilege of traveling thereon. But how did Ben Johnson turn up his axle (whatever that was) to make it resemble Mystic avenue or anThis was supported by a quotation: I move upon my axle like a turnpike. Ben Johnson, Staple of News, III Further search in our Public Library (by the ready courtesy of one of the staff) shows that Ben Johnson didn't turn up his axle. Rather, he dug into ancient mythology, and made one of his characters (Picklock by nam all things to all men and everything to everybody. It is evident that rare Ben Johnson was misquoted in the recent press notice, otherwise an excellent one. The
the taste, the gentlemanly point of it, must have been obvious to the House. But let me assure the right honorable gentleman that I do now, and will at any time he chooses to repeat this sort of allusion, meet it with the most sincere good humor. Nay, I will say more: flattered and encouraged by the right honorable gentleman's panegyric on my talents, if ever I again engage in the compositions he alludes to, I may be tempted to an act of presumption --to attempt an improvement on one of Ben Johnson's best characters, the character of the Angry Boy, in the Alchemist." The fury of Pitt, contrasted with the coolness of the man he had so shamefully attacked, made this sally irresistible, and from that time neither "the angry boy" himself, nor any of his colleagues, were anxious to twit Sheridan on his dramatic talents. Sheridan's oratorical fame culminated on the case of Warren Hastings. On the charge of the ex-Viceroy's treatment of those dusky ladies, the Begums of Oude, S
Twenty-five dollars reward. --Runaway from my place, in Chesterfield county, Va., my Negro Man Ben Johnson, of black color, about 5 feet 10 inches high, weighs about 175 lbs., apparently 45 or 50 years old, and is a good cook, and is probably hiring himself to cook in Richmond or Petersburg. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me at Pulliam & Co.'s office, or safe logdment in some jail. He came from Petersburg. Left home 1st March last. ap 17--tf Albert C. Pulliam.
Twenty-five dollars reward. --Runaway from my place, in Chesterfield county, Va., my Negro Man Ben Johnson, of black color, about 5 feet 10 inches high, weighs about 175 lbs., apparently 45 or 50 years old, and is a good cook, and is probably hiring himself to cook in Richmond or Petersburg. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me at Pulliam -- Co.'s office, or safe lodgment in some jail. He came from Petersburg. Left home 1st March last. Albert C. Pulliam. ap 17--1f
and still another, who is a poor man, having just arrived at our wharf with a load of wood for sale, delivered it up to the town auctioneer, with a request to sell it and appropriate it in the same way. The Wilmington Journal of Wednesday says: On Monday and yesterday (Tuesday) our whole community was deeply excited on the subject of the forts at the mouth of our harbor, and it was finally decided to occupy them in pursuance of orders. The flag of North Carolina now waves over Johnson and Caswell. It was desirable that the action of our community should be as quietly taken as possible, and therefore no reference was made to the matter in yesterday's or Monday's issue of the town papers, nor did any dispatches go off on the subject — none, at least, to the North. As, however, the matter has got into the Charleston papers, and further, as we now learn, that Col. Gardner, former commander at Charleston, but who has been staying here during the winter on furlough, post
Twenty-five dollars reward. --Runaway from my place, in Chesterfield county, Va., my Negro Man Ben Johnson, of Black color, about 5 feet 10 inches high, weighs about 175 lbs., apparently 45 or 50 years old, and is a good cook, and is probably hiring himself to cook in Richmond or Petersburg. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me at Pulliam & Co.'s office, or safe lodgment in some jail. He came from Petersburg. Left home 1st March last. ap 17--tf Albert C. Pulliam.
Twenty-five dollars reward. --Runaway from my place, in Chesterfield county, Va., my Negro Man Ben Johnson, of black color, about 5 feet 10 inches high, weighs about 175 lbs., supparently 45 or 50 years old, and is a good cook, and is probably hiring himself to cook in Richmond or Petersburg. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery to me at Pulliam& Co.'s's office, or safe lodgment in some jail. He came from Petersburg. Left home 1st March last. ap 17--if Albert C. Pulliam.
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