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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 127 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 6 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 46 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 28 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 24 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bushrod R. Johnson or search for Bushrod R. Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
el R. F. Webb. Twenty-first North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel W. S. Rankin. Fifty-fourth North Carolina, Colonel K M. Murchison. Fifty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel A. C. Godwin. First North Carolina Battalion, Major [R. W.] Wharton. Johnson's division. Stonewall brigade. the Virginia regiments constituted Terry's brigade, Gordon's division. Second Virginia, Colonel J. Q. A. Nadenbousch. Fourth Virginia, Colonel William Terry. Fifth Virginia, Colonel J. H. S. Funk. Twentts's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel A. S. Cutts. Ross's Battery, Captain H. M. Ross. Patterson's Battery, Captain G. M. Patterson. Irwin Artillery, Captain J. T. Wingfield. McIntosh's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel D. G. McIntosh. Johnson's Battery, Captain [V. J. Clutter.] Hardaway Artillery, Captain W. B. Hurt. Danville Artillery, Captain R. S. Rice. Second Rockbridge Artillery, Captain L. Donald. Richardson's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel C. Richardson. Lewis Art
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations before Petersburg, May 6-11, 1864. (search)
ars to reinforce Colonel Graham. The Twenty-seventh arrived a little later and followed, the whole arriving at Port Walthal Junction before day. I found Brigadier-General Johnson also at that point with some eight hundred muskets. He informed me that hearing the firing of Graham's action he had marched from the direction of Drewrnally the pressing of the enemy indicated an advance. I fell back under orders to the railroad, my left resting on the crossing of the turnpike and railroad; General Johnson's men on my right upon the railroad, and the Twenty-first regiment in reserve in rear of my centre and upon the turnpike. The enemy appeared at 2 P. M., inafter nightfall, having been delayed upon the cars in coming from South Carolina. At 12 o'clock that night our whole force at the Junction was withdrawn by General Johnson to the line of Swift Creek. On the 9th I was ordered to take a part of my brigade and make a reconnoissance in front of this line. I took the Twenty-first
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
der P. Stewart. Johnson's brigade. part of Johnson's provisional division. Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson. Colonel J. S. Fulton. Seventeenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Watt W. Floyd. ir's. September 19th attached to Longstreet's corps, under Major-General Hood. Brigadier-General Bushrod R. Johnson. Gregg's brigade. Brigadier-General John Gregg. Colonel C. A. Sugg. Thirdy-seventh Alabama. Forty-eighth Alabama. Robertson's brigade. served part of the time in Johnson's provisional division. Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson-Colonel Van H. Manning. Third Arkde. Colonel A. A. Russell. Fourth Alabama.( Two regiments of the same designation. Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson commanded that in Roddey's brigade.) First Confederate, Colonel W. B. Wade. Wigginadier-General P. D. Roddey. Fourth Alabama,( Two regiments of the same designation. Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson commanded that in Roddey's brigade.) Lieutenant-Colonel William A. Johnson. Fifth A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. (search)
e, commencing at Fort Stephens, with Hagood's brigade on the left, Johnson's on his right, then Clingman, with Corse upon his right. These tnemy had been turned, I ordered forward the brigades of Hagood and Johnson, with one section of Lieutenant-Colonel Eschelman's artillery, ande meantime the enemy made two charges upon the front of Hagood and Johnson to retake the lost works and artillery, but were most handsomely router line of works had moved upon the right flank and rear of General Johnson, which was some distance on the right of the pike and in the ore of no avail during these repeated attacks upon the right of General Johnson. I became alarmed for him, as he had several times sent to messity compelled me. In order, also, to relieve the position of General Johnson, which was our key, I ordered forward Corse with his brigade ae thrown back perpendicular to my front, to assist by a flank fire Johnson's brigade, which was driving the enemy from the portion of the out
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations from the 6th to the 11th of May, 1864—Report of General B. R. Johnson. (search)
Operations from the 6th to the 11th of May, 1864—Report of General B. R. Johnson. headquarters Johnson's brigade, Drewry's Bluff, May 31, 1864. Captain T. O. Chestney, A. A. G. Sir,—I su A. M. the following dispatch was handed to me in person: Richmond, May 6, 1864. Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson . I am astonished Hagood's brigade is not now at Port Walthall junction. March m General Bragg. I am, General, yours, &c., [Signed] C. Pickett, A. A. G. To Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson, Commanding, &c. I immediately ordered General Hagood to move forward by the tural, with much respect, Your obedient servant, [Signed] C. Pickett, A. A. G. To Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson, Commanding, & c. My dispatch announcing to General Pickett that I had given orrt of the actions and casualties at Port Walthall junction on the 7th and at Swift Creek on the 9th of May, 1864. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, [Signed] B. R. Johnson, Major-Gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
e command. Prisoners captured told me they supposed it was Hampton's command, from Gen. Lee's army, as we had come from the direction of Charlottesville, and they had heard that morning that General Early had been reinforced from Richmond). Captain Johnson's battery was handled with great skill. He opened on the working party attempting to pull the bridge to pieces with splendid effect. They scattered and started back at a run, and as long as there was a mark to fire at, east of Waynesboro, his guns blazed at it. Arriving at the river, the First, Second and Third were mounted, but the Fourth had pushed on, and had some sharp skirmishing in the town before the other regiments came up. Upon their arrival we soon cleared the town, and Johnson's battery took position on the west end and was having a sharp duel with the enemy's battery. This was after sun-down, when Gen. Early with his infantry appeared on their flank, and with a few shots from the artillery attached to Gen. Pegram's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fight at Waynesboroa. (search)
e command. Prisoners captured told me they supposed it was Hampton's command, from Gen. Lee's army, as we had come from the direction of Charlottesville, and they had heard that morning that General Early had been reinforced from Richmond). Captain Johnson's battery was handled with great skill. He opened on the working party attempting to pull the bridge to pieces with splendid effect. They scattered and started back at a run, and as long as there was a mark to fire at, east of Waynesboro, his guns blazed at it. Arriving at the river, the First, Second and Third were mounted, but the Fourth had pushed on, and had some sharp skirmishing in the town before the other regiments came up. Upon their arrival we soon cleared the town, and Johnson's battery took position on the west end and was having a sharp duel with the enemy's battery. This was after sun-down, when Gen. Early with his infantry appeared on their flank, and with a few shots from the artillery attached to Gen. Pegram's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ral Gracie's brigade was moved across the ford and established in line of battle, running almost east and west, near Hunt's house, and a few hundred yards north of the river, where it remained during the night. On the next morning my two remaining brigades crossed the river at dawn and were formed in line of battle in Hunt's field. Stewart's division soon occupied a position on my right and extended eastward in the direction of Tedford's Ford. Riding forward, I found troops of Brigadier-General Johnson's and Major-General Hood's commands forming in line of battle nearly at right angles to my own line, facing westward, toward the Chattanooga road, and afterwards met General Bragg, Major-General Hood and Major-General Buckner, who were conferring together. Having reported to Major-General Buckner the position of my troops, I returned, and about 8 o'clock received an order from him to advance through Hunt's field, in the direction of the enemy. Gracie's brigade was immediately con