Your search returned 62 results in 30 document sections:

1 2 3
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
ctively by Captains Davis, Walke, and Stembel, and Lieutenants-commanding Paulding, Thompson, and Shirk; four mortar-boats, under the general command of Lieutenant-commanding Phelps, assisted by Lieutenant Ford, of the Ordnance Corps, and Captain George Johnson, of Cincinnati; and three transports. The latter bore a small land force of little more than two thousand men, These were composed of Colonel Buford's Twenty-seventh Illinois, and a battalion each of the Fifty-fourth and Seventy-fourtnant Paulding; and Conestoga (not armored), Lieutenant Blodgett. The mortar-boats were in charge of Captain H. E. Maynadier, commander of the squadron Captain E. B. Pike, assistant commander; and Sailing-Masters Glassford, Gregory, Simonds, and Johnson. for the purpose of co-operating with General Pope. At Columbus he was joined by the Twenty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Buford, and some other troops, March 14. and moving down to Hickman, on the same shore of the Mississippi, he took possession
Doc. 115.-Beauregard's order. Headquarters, army of Potomac, Manassas, July 23, 1861. Colonel:--Mr. George Johnson, special agent of the Quartermaster's Department, is sent to Loudon county for the purpose of collecting wagons, teams, and grain forage for the use of this army. It is expected that he will have no difficulties whatsoever; that the loyal citizens of your rich county will be glad to have an opportunity thus to furnish supplies for our army, which has so gloriously maintained the independence and sovereignty of Virginia, and driven back in ignominious flight the invaders of her soil. But, at the same time, all classes of your citizens must contribute their quota; therefore, if necessary, it is expected that constraint must be employed with all who are forgetful of their obligations. By order of General Beauregard. Respectfully, Colonel, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, A. A. Adjutant General. To Colonel A. T. M. Rust, Commandant Militia, Loudon cou
Doc. 120.-debate on Johnson's resolution. On the resolution of Andrew Johnson, declaring that the present civil war was forced on the country by the disunionists in the South; delivered in the United States Senate, July 25, 1861, the following debate occurred: Mr. Breckenridge said he could not vote for the resolution, because he thought it did not state facts. The present condition of the country was due to the refusal of the majority last winter to listen to any terms of compromise or conciliation. The attack on Fort Sumter was not a sufficient cause for a general war. It was a local difficulty, which he believed might have been settled, but the subsequent acts of the President and his constitutional advisers had done much to bring about a general war. I believe, sir, the gentlemen who represent the majority of the people are responsible for the failure to bring about an adjustment of the difficulty. I do not think the Congress of the United States is acting up to its wh
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
ad a store in Sacramento, and was on the point of moving up to a ranch, for which he had bargained, on Bear Creek, on which was afterward established Camp Far West. He afterward sold the mules, wagon, etc., for me, and on the whole I think I cleared, by those two months work, about six thousand dollars. I then returned to headquarters at Sonoma, in time to attend my fellow aide-de-camp Gibbs through a long and dangerous sickness, during which he was on board a store-ship, guarded by Captain George Johnson, who now resides in San Francisco. General Smith had agreed that on the first good opportunity he would send me to the United States as a bearer of dispatches, but this he could not do until he had made the examination of Oregon, which was also in his command. During the summer of 1849 there continued to pour into California a perfect stream of people. Steamers came, and a line was established from San Francisco to Sacramento, of which the Senator was the pioneer, charging sixteen
to pass the ammunition from the ship's hold to the cannon's mouth. All fires and lights, except those connected with the engine-room, etc., were extinguished. The ward-room and cabin-furniture was removed to facilitate the working of the stern-guns. All hawsers and lines were coiled upon the deck to afford additional protection to the boilers and machinery. These many preparatory acts were the work of not more than half an hour. Meantime the four mortar-boats, under command of Capt. George Johnson, of Cincinnati, had been towed to the right bank (the Missouri side) of the river, and made fast to some trees near the Belmont Point. The transports had come as near to the bluffs as was consistent with their safety, and were standing off in the centre of the stream, about a mile above us. The fleet was now ready to make the attack. It was necessary first, to ascertain whether there was anything to attack. Spy-glasses were brought into requisition, but in our position, three mi
ense, and with such profusion of all the appliances of war. These successful results were not achieved, however, as before said, without severe loss; a loss not to be measured by the number of the slain or wounded, but by the high social and personal position of so large a number of those who were killed or disabled, including the commander of the forces, whose high qualities will be greatly missed in the momentous campaign impending. I deeply regret to record, also, the death of the Hon. George Johnson, Provisional Governor of Kentucky, who went into action with the Kentucky troops, and continually inspired them by his words and example. Having his horse shot under him Sunday, he entered the ranks of a Kentucky regiment on Monday, and fell mortally wounded towards the close of the day. Not his State alone, but the whole Confederacy, will mourn the death of this brave, upright, and noble man. Another gallant and able soldier and captain was lost to the service of the country wh
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
n Day. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Nathaniel Hatch. The town-treasurer in 1861, and until Aug. 19, 1862, was William Tenney; and from that time until the present, 1871, Harvey M. Fowle. 1861. At the annual town-meeting held on the 26th of April, one thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to the families of citizens who have entered into active military service, or who may hereafter volunteer in the military service of their country; and E. F. Brigham and George Johnson were chosen to act with the selectmen in distributing the money appropriated. 1862. On the 17th of March the selectmen were authorized to borrow money necessary to furnish State aid to the families of volunteers, to be distributed in accordance with the law of the Commonwealth. July 21st, The selectmen were directed to raise money to pay each person now resident of Bradford, who shall enlist and be accepted within three weeks, the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, the sum to be p
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 39: capture of the regiment. (search)
Edward McKenna. Eben D. Poole. William Farnham. Charles Dean. These 67 recruits had been forwarded to the regiment only the day before and were captured with the others. Co. A.Robert Boyd. Herman Weitzler. Robert A. Johnston. Bernard Van Ammon. Solomon Salter. Doffles Goarout. Carl Rummelsburg. Co. B.Joseph Richardson. William Doyle. Henry M. Allen. Charles Edwards. M. Sweeney. John McKane. John Scott. Co. C.Charles Belcher, Jr. Richard Meagher. Conrad Wilson. George Johnson. George Kent. William Anderson. Charles Sherman. Lewis Mortimer. Co. D.John Berden. David Spence. Thomas Lavey. George Barry. Frank Farren. Co. E.Patrick Flinn. Robert McAllen. James Smithers. Delos Gilbert. Thomas H. Collins. Stephen Hogan. Patrick Conway. Daniel Hoyt. Co. F.Nathan H. Roberts. George Dennett. Edward Haskins. William Haney. James McMahon. John Deansfield. Alexander Goodhue. William Dittmer. Co. G.August Weilmar. James Power. John Bryan. J
................................. 331 Jenkins, Charles F.,.................................................. 106 Jennings, Henry G.,..................................... 324 Jerusalem Plank Road,................................................ 326 Jettsville, Va.,........................................................ 363 Jewett, D. J. M. A.,................................... 183, 189, 231, 288, 356 Johnson, Charles A.,............................................ 249, 262 Johnson, George,...................................................... 330 Johnson, Giles D. W.,..................................... 284, 328 Johnson, Henry,..................................................... 127 Johnson, Loring,...................................................... 324 Johnson, Peter,.................................................... 330, 348 Johnson, President,............................................... 364, 365 Johnson, William,........................................
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
. Colhoun and Capt. T. B. Hayne respectively, officers of Companies A, B and C, of Lucas' command. In the same way, lower down the Stono, at Battery island, Maj. J. W. Brown, Second artillery, concealed two rifled 24-pounders in the woods, at night, built platforms for them in the old battery, and kept in hiding for the event. Brown's guns were commanded by Lieuts. John A. Bellinger, Company B, and F. Lake, Company K. Fifty men of the Eighth Georgia battalion, under Lieuts. R. Hays and George Johnson, were detailed as sharpshooters. Lieut.--Col. Joseph A. Yates, First regulars, made a secret disposition of a larger force, on John's island, between the guns of Gary and Brown. He took two companies of Major Alston's siege train, A and B, commanded by Capt. B. C. Webb and Lieut. S. W. Willson, Jr.; Company F, Palmetto battalion, Capt. F. C. Schulz; a light battery, commanded by Capt. F. H. Harleston; one Parrott gun, in charge of Lieut. T. E. Gregg; Capt. John C. Mitchel's company, I,
1 2 3