hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 14 results in 5 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, (search)
residential candidate. Some of the Southern members remained in the convention; and the speech of a delegate from Arkansas (Mr. Flournoy), a slave-holder and friend of the system, was so liberal that it had a powerful effect upon delegates from the free-labor States in favor of Mr. Douglas. Of 194 votes cast on the second ballot, Mr. Douglas received 181, and he was declared duly nominated. Mr. Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, nominated for Vice-President, declined two days afterwards, and Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia, was substituted. The convention adjourned June 23, 1860. Early in January, 1861, Gov. John A. Andrew (q. v.), of Massachusetts, tendered troops to the government for its protection. Fort Sumter was attacked, and on the day when the President's call for troops was issued, Senator Wilson telegraphed to Governor Andrew to despatch twenty companies to Washington immediately. The formal requisition of the Secretary of War arrived an hour later, calling for two regiments
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
rge M. Troup1823-27 John Forsyth1827-29 George R. Gilmer1829-31 Wilson Lumpkin1831-35 William Schley1835-37 George R. Gilmer1837-39 Charles J. McDonald1839-43 George W. Crawford1843-47 George W. B. Towns1847-51 Howell Cobb1851-53 Herschel V. Johnson1853-57 Joseph E. Brown1857-65 James Johnson1865 Charles J. Jenkins1865-67 Gen. T. H. Ruger1867-68 Rufus B. Bullock1868-72 James Milton Smith1872-77 Alfred H. Colquitt1877-82 Alexander H. Stephens1882-83 Henry D. McDaniel1883-86 J. Troup21st to 22d1829 to 1833 Alfred Cuthbert23d to 27th1834 to 1843 John P. King23d to 24th1833 to 1837 Wilson Lumpkin25th to 26th1837 to 1841 John McPherson Berrien27th to 32d1841 to 1852 Walter T. Colquitt28th to 30th1843 to 1848 Herschel V. Johnson30th1848 William C. Dawson31st to 33d1849 to 1855 Robert M. Charlton32d1852 Robert Toombs33d to 36th1853 to 1861 Alfred Iverson34th to 36th1855 to 1861 36th to 41st1861 to 1871 Joshua Hill41st to 42d 1871 to 1873 H. V. M. Miller41st1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Herschel Vespasian 1812-1880 (search)
Johnson, Herschel Vespasian 1812-1880 Legislator; born in Burke county, Ga., Sept. 18, 1812; graduated at the University of Georgia in 1834; appointed for an unexpired term to the United States Senate in 1848; elected judge of the Superior Court of Georgia in 1849; governor in 1853 and 1855. In the Civil War he was a member of the Confederate Senate; was elected to the United States Senate during the reconstruction period, but was not allowed to take his seat, and was appointed judge of t to the United States Senate in 1848; elected judge of the Superior Court of Georgia in 1849; governor in 1853 and 1855. In the Civil War he was a member of the Confederate Senate; was elected to the United States Senate during the reconstruction period, but was not allowed to take his seat, and was appointed judge of the circuit court in 1873. In 1860 Mr. Johnson was the candidate for the Vice-Presidency on the ticket with Stephen A. Douglas. He died in Jefferson county, Ga., Aug. 16, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
les at Baltimore pursuant to adjournment......June 18, 1860 After some days of debate over credentials of delegates, many delegates withdraw, and the chairman, Caleb Cushing, of Massachusetts, resigns. David Tod, of Ohio, is chosen chairman, and balloting begins......June 22, 1860 [On the second ballot Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois, received 181 1/2 votes. Benjamin Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, was nominated for Vice-President, but declined, and the national committee nominated Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia.] A loan of $21,000,000 authorized by Congress......June 22, 1860 Homestead bill vetoed by the President......June 22, 1860 [Senate fails to pass it over the veto by three votes.] First session adjourns......June 25, 1860 Steamship Great Eastern sails from England, June 17, reaching New York in eleven days, two hours......June 28, 1860 Kansas elects a convention to draft a second constitution; it meets......July 5, 1860 [Under this, the Wyandotte constitu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
Brown vetoes bill suspending forfeiture proceedings against banks for one year; the banks in Augusta and elsewhere resume specie payment......May 1, 1858 Georgia schooner-yacht Wanderer seized in New York on suspicion of being a slavetrader, but released.......June 16, 1858 Governor Brown seizes forts Pulaski and Jackson sixteen days before Georgia secedes......Jan. 3, 1861 Ordinance of secession passed (yeas, 208; nays, 89)......Jan. 19, 1861 [Alexander H. Stephens and Herschel V. Johnson vote nay.] Members of Congress from Georgia withdraw......Jan. 23, 1861 Iverson withdraws from the Senate......Jan. 28, 1861 Mint at Dahlonega seized by Confederate authorities of Georgia......Feb. 28, 1861 Georgia adopts Confederate constitution......March 16, 1861 Georgia adopts a State constitution......March 23, 1861 Governor Brown by proclamation forbids the people of Georgia to pay Northern creditors......April 26, 1861 Admiral Dupont, U. S. N., takes Tybee