Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James Johnson or search for James Johnson in all documents.

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Doc. 214.-Col. Mann's Regiment of Penn. List of the officers of the regiment: Regimental officers.--Colonel, Wm. B. Mann; Lieut.-Col., Albert Magilton; Major, Wm. McCandless; Adjutant, James L. Hall; Quartermaster, Chas. F. Hoyt. Company officers.--Company A--Capt., Richard Ellis; 1st. Lieut, John Corley; 2d Lieut., George Young; Orderly Sergeant, S. L. McKinny. Company B--Capt., Timothy Meely; 1st Lieut., Peter Summers; 2d Lieut., Robt. H. Porter; Orderly Sergeant, James Johnson. Company C--Capt., Robt. M. McClure; 1st Lieut., Edwin W. Cox; 2d Lieut., Fred. A. Conrad; Orderly Sergeant, John St. John. Company D--Capt., Patrick McDonough; 1st Lieut., John D. Shoch; 2d Lieut., John Gill; Orderly Sergeant, Wm. Crow. Company E--Capt.,----Bringhurzt; 1st Lieut., George Keit; 2d Lieut, Wm, J. D. Eward; Orderly Sergeant, Christ. P. Rass. Company F--Capt., William Knox; 1st Lieut., Thomas Weir; 2d Lieut., Thomas Jack; Orderly Sergeant, David Chitester. Company G--Capt., James
of this State. I have been among them for several days. I have visited their plantations, I have conversed with them freely and fully, and I have enjoyed that frank, courteous, and graceful intercourse which constitutes an irresistible charm of their society. From all quarters have come to my ears the echoes of the same voice; it may be feigned, but there is no discord in the note, and it sounds in wonderful strength and monotony all over the country. Shades of George III., of North, of Johnson, of all who contended against the great rebellion which tore these colonies from England, can you hear the chorus which rings through the State of Marion, Sumter, and Pinckney, and not clap your ghostly hands in triumph? That voice says, If we could only get one of the royal race of England to rule over us, we should be content. Let there be no misconception on this point. That sentiment, varied in a hundred ways, has been repeated to me over and over again. There is a general admission