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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. Few women had the good fortune in the war between the States to have such opportunities for good as the subject of this memoir, and no one ever improved them as shhis service to the party, to the cause of Texas, and to the President elect. The mother of Mrs. Johnson was Anna Hayes Johnson, daughter of the Hon. William Johnson, of South Carolina, Justice of tce, and place on record our appreciation of her eminent virtues and inestimable services— Jane Claudia Johnson. The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. A paper read by Charles M. Blackford, ofparty was being moved northward, the noncombatant officials, Stanton, Dana, Holt, Halleck, President Johnson and others, were much excited and very industrious. Mr. Secretary Stanton ordered the casthe credulous Judge-Advocate General. Soon after the prisoner was lodged in his casemate, President Johnson sent the Hon. Preston King, of New York, to see Judge Underwood, of the United States Dist
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument Dedicated. (search)
berties of the people, and to maintain its institutions as a refuge for the oppressed and its mission as a protector against the oppressor. But these fallen heroes are not alone in their claim to our affection. The women of the South—whose tender care was lavished upon the sick and wounded; whose Spartan courage bade their sons, husbands, and lovers go forth to battle while they uncomplaining assumed the stern duty of providing for the household; who unflinchingly preserved under all conditions of adversity and trial, and even when their loved ones had fallen, abated not a jot in their steadfastness and loyalty, but whose every word and deed gave emphasis to the sentiment, Better an honored grave than a dishonored life —to these daughters of our fair Southland we yield our grateful homage. To one of these we this day rear in enduring granite a mark of our loving remembrance, and place on record our appreciation of her eminent virtues and inestimable services— Jane Claudia Johnson
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ed his duty in this respect as a soldier and gentleman, and subjected his unfortunate prisoner to no insult or undue restraint. While the captured party was being moved northward, the noncombatant officials, Stanton, Dana, Holt, Halleck, President Johnson and others, were much excited and very industrious. Mr. Secretary Stanton ordered the casemates at Fortress Monroe to be prepared under the special direction of Major-General H. W. Halleck, who commanded the department of the James at Rich his vengeful feeling. As has been said, the idea of bringing Mr. Davis to trial before a military commission was early abandoned by every one but the credulous Judge-Advocate General. Soon after the prisoner was lodged in his casemate, President Johnson sent the Hon. Preston King, of New York, to see Judge Underwood, of the United States District Court for the District of Virginia, and to ask an interview in regard to the trial of Mr. Davis for treason. It was arranged that he should be