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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: May 4, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Waldo P. Johnson or search for Waldo P. Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
because of alleged treacherous. acts. Fortifications at Bolivar Point, Galveston Harbor, Tex., destroyed by the United States frigate Santee.—9. The Confederate Congress passed a bill admitting Kentucky into the Southern Confederacy.—20. Confederates destroyed about 100 miles of the North Missouri Railroad, with its stations, bridges, ties, fuel, water-tanks, and telegraph-poles.— 30. The banks of New York, Albany, Philadelphia, and Boston suspend specie payments. 1862.—Jan. 10. Waldo P. Johnson and Trusten Polk, of Missouri, expelled from the United States Senate.—11. Bridges of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad burned by the Confederates.—16. The Ohio legislature authorized the banks of that State to suspend specie payments.—17. Cedar Keys, Fla., captured by Union troops.—30. the Monitor launched.— Feb. 3. Confederate steamer Nashville ordered to leave Southampton (England) Harbor; the United States gunboat Tuscarora, starting in pursuit, stopped by the Bri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
sJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871 to 1873 Carl Schurz41st to 42d1869 to 1875 Lewis F. Bogy43d to 45th1873 to 1877 Francis M. Cockrell44th to—1875 to — David H. Armstrong45th1877 to 1879 George G. Vest46th to—187
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Senate, United States (search)
tack on Charles Sumner occurred in the Senate chamber after the body had adjourned, and the offending party was not a member of the Senate. The Senate has exercised its power of explusion five times. William Blount, a Senator from Tennessee, was expelled July 8, 1797, for complicity in a scheme to transfer New Orleans and adjacent territory from Spain to Great Britain. John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, was expelled Dec. 4, 1861, for participation in the Rebellion. Trusten Polk and Waldo P. Johnson, Senators from Missouri, were expelled Jan. 10, 1862, for aiding and abetting the Rebellion. Jesse D. Bright, of Indiana, was expelled on Feb. 5, 1862, for disloyalty in writing a letter to Jefferson Davis introducing a man who wanted to dispose of what he regards a great improvement in fire-arms. In connection with these expulsions for disloyalty it may be stated that the Senators from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texa