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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Department (search)
s in the Southern States. Private and public losses during the war. Treatment of citizens by hostile forces. 20. Southern poetry, ballads, songs, etc. The following are the officers of the Southern Historical Society, under the re-organization: Parent Society, Richmond, Va.--Gen. Jubal A. Early, President; Hon. Robert M. T. Hunter, Vice-President; Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary and Treasurer. Executive Committee.--Gen. Dabney H. Maury, Chairman; Col. Charles S. Venable, Col. Wm. Preston Johnson, Col. Robert E. Withers, Col. Joseph Mayo, Col. Geo. W. Munford, Lt. Col. Archer Anderson, Maj. Robert Stiles, George L. Christian, Esq. Vice-Presidents of States.--Gen. Isaac R. Trimble, Maryland; Gov. Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina; Gen. M. C. Butler, South Carolina; Gen. A. H. Colquit, Georgia; Admiral R. Semmes, Alabama; Col. W. Call, Florida; Gen. Wm. T. Martin, Mississippi; Gen. J. B. Hood, Louisiana; Col. T. M. Jack, Texas; Hon. A. H. Garland, Arkansas; Gov. Isham G. Har
possible to secure finer results. Lee's greatness of soul was shown in the way in which he urged the Southern people loyally to accept the result of the war. On the morning of October 12, 1870, at the age of sixty-three, he died-mourned throughout the Union which he had helped to reunite, and throughout the civilized world, which had watched with admiration his gallant fight and nobility of soul. To those who saw his composure under the greater and lesser trials of life, wrote Colonel William Preston Johnson, his intimate friend, and his justice and forbearance with the most unjust and uncharitable, it seemed scarcely credible that his serene soul was shaken by the evil that raged around him. On his dying bed he fought over the great battles of the war. How strongly he felt his responsibility is shown by nearly his last words: Tell Hill he must come up. Lee in 1867 president of Washington college, later Washington and Lee university Lee in 1869 the year before his death at