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before daylight by the Back road, which is parallel to and about three males from the Valley pike, and attack the enemy at Tom's Brook crossing, while Merritt's instructions were to assail him on the Valley pike in concert with Custer. About 7 in the morning, Custer's division encountered Rosser himself with three brigades, and while the stirring sounds of the resulting artillery duel were reverberating through the valley Merritt moved briskly to the front and fell upon Generals Lomax and Johnson on the Valley pike. Merritt, by extending his right, quickly established connection with Custer, and the two divisions moved forward together under Torbert's direction, with a determination to inflict on the enemy the sharp and summary punishment his rashness had invited. The engagement soon became general across the valley, both sides fighting mainly mounted. For about two hours the contending lines struggled with each other along Tom's Brook, the charges and counter charges at many
rt, but this had already been done by Lomax, with the assistance of infantry sent up from Richmond. Indeed, from the very beginning of the movement the Confederates had been closely observing the columns of Torbert and Custer, and in consequence of the knowledge thus derived, Early had marched Lomax to Gordonsville in anticipation of an attack there, at the same time sending Rosser down the valley to meet Custer. Torbert in the performance of his task captured two pieces of artillery from Johnson's and McCausland's brigades, at Liberty Mills on the Rapidan River, but in the main the purpose of the raid utterly failed, so by the 27th of December he returned, many of his men badly frost-bitten from the extreme cold which had prevailed. This expedition practically closed all operations for the season, and the cavalry was put into winter cantonment near Winchester. The distribution of my infantry to Petersburg and West Virginia left with me in the beginning of the new year, as alre
as still back at Rowanty Creek, trying to get the trains up. This force had been counted while crossing the creek on the 29th, the three divisions numbering 9,000 enlisted men, Crook having 9,000, and Custer and Devin 5,700. During the 30th, the enemy had been concentrating his cavalry, and by evening General W. H. F. Lee and General Rosser had joined Fitzhugh Lee near Five Forks. To this force was added, about dark, five brigades of infantry-three from Pickett's division, and two from Johnson's-all under command of Pickett. The infantry came by the White Oak road from the right of General Lee's intrenchments, and their arrival became positively known to me about dark, the confirmatory intelligence being brought in then by some of Young's scouts who had been inside the Confederate lines. On the 31st, the rain having ceased, directions were given at an early hour to both Merritt and Crook to make reconnoissances preparatory to securing Five Forks, and about 9 o'clock Merritt
t my reports of the massacre portions suppressed by President Johnson sustained by a Congressional committee the Reconstre, continued to discharge the duties of Governor till President Johnson, on June 17, in harmony with his amnesty proclamations not all granted, but under his ingenious persuasion President Johnson, on the 13th of August, 1866, directed that the new g made at the North for the publication of the despatch, Mr. Johnson pretended to give it to the newspapers. It appeared in murred; and this emphatic protest marks the beginning of Mr. Johnson's well-known personal hostility toward me. In the mean tf the Gulf, New Orleans, La., August 6, 1866. His Excellency Andrew Johnson, President United States: I have the honor to ee likewise called attention to a violent speech made by Mr. Johnson at St. Louis in September, 1866, charging the origin of served to intensify and concentrate the opposition to President Johnson's policy of reconstruction, a policy resting exclusiv
unity in the city, for it will be understood that Mr. Johnson was, through his friends and adherents in Louisiatheir work so secretly and quickly that sometimes Mr. Johnson knew of my official acts before I could report thes and property. This was the natural outcome of Mr. Johnson's defiance of Congress, coupled with the sudden cs, and though they had been liberated by the war, Mr. Johnson's policy now proposed that they should have no pomarch of terrorism inaugurated by the people whom Mr. Johnson had deluded. The first Military Commission was B. Steadman New Orleans, June 19, 1867. Andrew Johnson, President United States, Washington City: Lr a revision of the jury lists; and, in short, President Johnson's policy now became supreme, till Hancock hims by garbling my report of the riot of 1866. When Mr. Johnson decided to remove me, General Grant protested in al U. S.A., Secretary of War ad interim. His Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. I was o