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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
cattle as the regulars escorted them through the streets. But the telegraph flamed out the news of the secession of Virginia, and at night the story of the capture of Harper's Ferry by the Virginia troops, with whom were Marylanders led by Bradley Johnson. The town was afire the night of the 18th. From all quarters came tidings of troops from the North and West, concentrating on Baltimore. The efficient militia of Massachusetts, under Maj.-Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, a man of ability, vigor antation in Anne Arundel county. The party of action, the young men, looked to these old soldiers for advice and leadership. But they were too old soldiers to plunge into a fight without troops, arms, ammunition or a commissary department. Bradley Johnson and other young men were ready, but they had neither the experience nor the knowledge to qualify them for immediate leadership. So on the night of April 18, 1861, Maryland was standing alert, braced up, ready to charge at the word. Virgi
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
history of his adopted State. His chivalrous character, great personal bravery, and capacity for generalship, were proved on many occasions. It may be said with the hearty approval of all of Maryland's brave soldiers that among them, as Gen. Bradley Johnson says, he performed the most distinguished service, obtained the highest rank and won the greatest fame.” After the close of hostilities he made his home at Baltimore until his death, which occurred January 2, 1888. Major-General Mansfieldnd at Cross Keys, which disabled him for some time. In the Pennsylvania campaign he commanded a brigade consisting of the Second Maryland, the First and Third North Carolina, and the Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirtysev-enth Virginia regiments, in Johnson's division of Ewell's corps, and was distinguished in the assault on Culp's Hill. In the first of the fighting at the Wilderness in 1864, he is found pushing in with his brigade after the repulse of Jones to meet the Federal attack, and continu