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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 192 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 128 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 99 11 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 85 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 57 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 43 13 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 36 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Bradley T. Johnson or search for Bradley T. Johnson in all documents.

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imore, on the railroads to Philadelphia and Harrisburg, burned; thus shutting off Washington and the Government from all communication with the Northern, as Gov. Letcher and his backers had just excluded them from all intercourse with the Southern, States. The telegraphic communication westward was preserved, to enable the master-spirits to dispatch to their confederates in Western Maryland such messages as this to one at Frederick, who soon after joined the Confederate army: To Bradley T. Johnson, Esq.: Thank you for your offer. Bring your men by the first train, and we will arrange with the railroad afterward. Streets red with Maryland blood. Send expresses over the mountains and valleys of Maryland and Virginia for the riflemen to come without delay. Further hordes [of Union volunteers] will be down upon us to-morrow [the 20th]. We will fight them, and whip them, or die. Geo. P. Kane. Mayor Brown sent three envoys to the President, bearing a dispatch indorsed b
a: see West Virginia. Kane, Judge John I., letter to from Polk, 169; his decision in the case of Euphemia Williams, 216. Kane, George P., Marshal of the Baltimore Police, 421; puts a stop to the riot at Baltimore, 464; his dispatch to Bradley T. Johnson, 465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 to 251; admitted as a State, 251. (See John Brown, Border Ruffians, etc.) Kearsarge, U. S. Gunboat, blockades the Sumter at Gibraltar, 602. McIntosh, Francis J., burnt by a mob, 134. McLean, Judge, decision in Margaret Garner's case, 219; opinion in the Dred Scott case, 260. Mecklenburg Declaration, the, 35. Memphis, Tenn., celebration of South Carolina's secession at; Senator Johnson burnt in effigy, etc., 407. Memphis Appeal, The, citation from, 597. Memphis Avalanche, The, citation from, 597. Meigs, Henry, vote on Missouri Compromise, 80. Memminger, Chas. G., of S. C., 34-1; 429. Mervine, Com. Wm., dest