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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 192 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 128 36 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 99 11 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 85 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 57 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 43 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Bradley T. Johnson or search for Bradley T. Johnson in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: Maryland in its Origin, progress, and Eventual relations to the Confederate movement. (search)
sical force, Maryland, though utterly and entirely oppose to secession, or disunion, as a remedy or relief, still began to prepare herself for an uncertain future. Her legislature in 1860 appropriated seventy thousand dollars to arm the militia of the State and entrusted the distribution of them to Thomas Holliday Hicks, governor, and his: adjutant-general. In 1859. the Democratic party, then struggling to rescue the State from the Know Nothings, whose governor Hicks was, selected Bradley T. Johnson as chairman of the State committee and the direction of the struggle was entrusted to his hands. In 1860 he was a delegate from Maryland to the Democratic national convention at Charleston and represented Maryland in the committee on resolutions. In that committee Maryland always voted with the Southern States. When that convention held its adjourned meeting in Baltimore, the majority of the Maryland delegation, with the chairman of its State committee, withdrew with the Southern St
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
South. That evening, April 9th, Marshal Kane telegraphed to Bradley T. Johnson at Frederick: Streets red with Maryland blood. Send expressedown on us to-morrow. We will fight them and whip them or die. Johnson, since the failure of the conference convention of March to act, hrevolution, which it was clear, was upon the whole country. Captain Johnson had brought back his company from Baltimore, armed with Hall'snia. The peace commissioners reported on May 6th. On the 8th Captain Johnson, having secured from Mason an engagement that all troops that of eight companies collected at Point of Rocks: Co. A. Capt. Bradley T. Johnson. Co. B. Capt. C. C. Edelin, at Harper's Ferry. Co. C. e had superseded Colonel Jackson in command at Harper's Ferry. Captain Johnson, as senior captain, refused to recognize the Virginia authorit Confederate States, with Charles S. Winder, late captain Ninth infantry, U. S. A., as colonel, and Bradley T. Johnson as lieutenant-colonel.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
if not in name. These were the intentions of Captain Johnson and men of his age in the legislature and in thugh it was not made until the 10th. But on the 8th Johnson and his company marched to Virginia. At the Point hed T. Parkin Scott, member from Baltimore City, to Johnson, then on the Maryland Heights with the Maryland batf the Confederate States. At this crisis Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson came forward and offered to go to North Carba, who afterward became empress of the French. Mrs. Johnson was then in the prime of her youth, handsome, gro serve him. She was the only hope of Maryland. Captain Johnson applied to Colonel Jackson for advice in this emergency. Jackson ordered that Mrs. Johnson be furnished with escort and transportation and that she start at, with halters round their necks. On the 29th Mrs. Johnson left Raleigh with her escort and her arms, and hment, Harper's Ferry, Va., June 3, 1861, of Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson, Five Hundred Mississippi rifles (cal. 54)
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
cis Q. Thomas, ex-captain United States army, as colonel of the First; to Bradley T. Johnson as lieutenant-colonel of the Second, and to Alden Weston, major of the Tidate these three into one if they failed to fill up into full regiments. Captain Johnson promptly declined the commission sent him by Governor Letcher, refusing tohe Maryland Line was the ideal of Lieut.-Col. George H. Steuart and of Maj. Bradley T. Johnson, and for two years they labored to collect the Marylanders. All influnders were generally youths unmarried. The field officers, Elzey, Steuart and Johnson, were the only married officers of the First Maryland regiment. Social lifeGeorge H. Steuart, late United States cavalry, as lieutenant-colonel, and Bradley T. Johnson as major. It consisted of 500 men armed with Mrs. Johnson's rifles, caliMrs. Johnson's rifles, calibre 54, and 220 men (the three Richmond companies) with Springfield muskets and bayonets. The drill and style of the Richmond companies set the standard for the rest
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
danger; for it was to protect the valley of Virginia from the Potomac to the North Carolina and Tennessee line. Virginia troops were poured into the place. Captain Johnson, as we have seen, procured from Colonel Jackson permission to rendezvous the Marylanders there and at the Point of Rocks, and by June 1st had collected about Johnston saw the absolute necessity of holding Maryland heights, he saved the invasion of Maryland by sending Marylanders to occupy the position. He ordered Captain Johnson with his eight companies, and Col. Blanton Duncan with his First Kentucky regiment, to take the Maryland heights, fortify and hold them. They did so while Jont Davis came up with General Johnston. General Elzey, I congratulate you, said the man who made generals. Elzey was promoted brigadier-general, Steuart colonel, Johnson lieutenant-colonel, and E. R. Dorsey, captain Company C, major—all to date from July 21st, the day of the great victory. The First Maryland was pushed on in pu
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
irst Maryland, four companies, under Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson moved out to Burke's Station to relited brigadier-general on March 28th; Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson colonel, and Major Dorsey, lieutenanrear. General Ewell, General Steuart and Colonel Johnson were riding at the head of the column. Wt last the skirmishers were withdrawn and Colonel Johnson made a dash forward at a stone wall, whicp to meet Fremont. Winder sent orders to Colonel Johnson that if charged by cavalry he must take tthe rear, they lost their post of honor. Colonel Johnson that morning had dressed himself in a new up to their place in line, Ewell said to Colonel Johnson, Colonel, you must carry a bucktail in yo crossing the river by sunrise of the 9th Colonel Johnson gained Ewell's permission to stop and getent, on the 6th of June, when, led by Col. Bradley T. Johnson, they drove back with loss the Pennsyls, the fighting being close and bloody. Colonel Johnson came up with his regiment in the hottest [14 more...]
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
move them. General Jackson, riding up, asked Johnson, Colonel, what have you stopped for? I can'ton, swinging his right arm to the right. Colonel Johnson immediately obeyed the order and moved foon the right, and General Winder directed Colonel Johnson to take direction of the line and charge.med and put through the manual of arms by Colonel Johnson as deliberately as if on dress parade. Hhe minie-balls occasionally would reach. Colonel Johnson got blood up, said, Men, I have offered ich had been badly cut up. Winder ordered Colonel Johnson forward to cover and hold as much of the with acute anger by the regiment itself. Colonel Johnson mustered them out on the 17th, the men presented their flag and their bucktail to Mrs. Johnson and then dispersed, grieved and offended. Genates, that he be made brigadier-general. Colonel Johnson declined to go to Richmond, or become an 8, 1862. A few companies reported to Colonel Johnson under this call. Just at the time, Gen. [6 more...]
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
duty of courage and chivalry. The First Maryland under Kenly was the only Maryland regiment on the Union side. The Confederate Marylanders, on the other hand, embodied the faith and pride of the State. Not a historic family of Maryland but was represented in the Maryland Line. Five grandsons of John Eager Howard, of the Cowpens, carried sword or musket in the First Maryland regiment. A grandson of Charles Carroll of Carrollton rode as a private in Company K, First Virginia cavalry. Colonel Johnson, of the Maryland Line, rode at the head of seventy-two kinsmen, descendants of soldiers of the Revolution, his own flesh and blood! In the summer of 1862 the First and Second Eastern Shore regiments were raised under Colonels Wallace and Wilkins; the First and Second regiments Potomac home brigade under Colonels Maulsby and Johns; and the Purnell Legion of one regiment infantry, Col. William Louis Schley, one company of artillery and two troops of cavalry; the First Maryland artiller
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
, George Brighthaupt, William C. Wrighttor. Company H: Captain, J. Thomas Bussey. Col. Bradley T. Johnson had first been unanimously elected by the officers of the battalion to be lieutenant-colonel. Colonel Johnson was at that time on the military court at Richmond and had not contributed to the organization of the new command. He declined the proffered commission on the ground that it inchester they marched with the army to Gettysburg. On the evening of the first of July, 1863, Johnson's division being on the left of Ewell's corps, which was the left of the army, moved about niginia, where in November it was detached from Steuart's brigade and ordered to report to Col. Bradley T. Johnson, commanding the Maryland Line at Hanover Junction. On June 2, 1864, the Second Marylcavalry served in Jenkins' brigade, and then in the brigades of Gens. Fitz Lee and Lomax until November, 1863, when it was ordered to report to Col. Bradley T. Johnson, commanding the Maryland Line.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
sed the Potomac and moved into Pennsylvania. Johnson, chafing at being in the rear when the army wson in command of the Second corps, and knew Johnson well. He said in his crisp, brusque way, Thi front. The next day, the 3d, Ewell assigned Johnson to the command of his old brigade, and he remts. The field and staff consisted of: Bradley T. Johnson, colonel commanding; George W. Booth, carning for thirty days. By order of Col. Bradley T. Johnson, George W. Booth, A. A. G. The Maryl After this engagement at Trevilian's, Colonel Johnson obtained permission from General Hampton ter, then rapidly approaching Lynchburg. Colonel Johnson felt himself bound to disclose to Generalt we can do. So instead of riding his raid Johnson marched to Waynesboro and waited with what pawere added to the command. In a few days Colonel Johnson received his commission of brigadier-geneore than half a day's fight drove him away. Johnson's cavalry brigade consisted of 800 mounted me[4 more...]
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