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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 127 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 6 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 46 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 28 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 24 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bushrod R. Johnson or search for Bushrod R. Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
e last retreat he was the main agent of supplies to Johnson's Division, though he was but the commissary of ourhen we were reinforced by our 59th regiment and by (Johnson) Hagood's South Carolina brigade; the other reinforhat day until about eleven o'clock at night. Bushrod R. Johnson's old brigade was on a hill on our extreme rih and parted with him at 11 P. M., to see that General Johnson would have the gap filled up. He reported to JoJohnson and warned him of the disaster likely to occur before sunrise the next morning. He professed to have isss, but they were not executed, and the next morning Johnson's Brigade gave way, the 26th was flanked on the rigroad past the enemy. Anderson, Pickett and (B. R.) Johnson had left the field before we cut through and gone o to where he was sitting in his saddle, with General B. R. Johnson on his horse a little in the rear. The lattcommand of all men of all ranks? looking at General B. R. Johnson. Lee then understood my meaning, turned his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
ee's army, was standing near, and paid a high compliment to Mahone's foresight. The last act in the great battle. This was the last act in this celebrated battle—a battle won by the charge of three small brigades of Virginia, Georgia and Alabama troops, numbering less than 2,000 muskets, with the aid of the artillery, which rendered effective service to the charging columns, over an army of 70,000 men behind breast-works, which surrendered to this small force nineteen flags. General B. R. Johnson, who commanded the lines which were broken by the explosion and upheaval of the Crater, in his report of the battle, said: To the able commander and gallant officers and men of Mahone's Division, to whom we are mainly indebted for the restoration of our lines, I offer my acknowledgments for their great service. Secretary of War James A. Seddon said: Let appropriate acknowledgment be made to the gallant general and his brave troops. Let the names of the captors (of the flags) be n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal service Corps. [Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., May 2, 1897.] (search)
he Signal Corps there bore themselves in the midst of dangers that caused the bravest to tremble, standing nobly at their post, and only leaving the island with the rear guard, at the evacuation. There were also members of the corps, who at other points, not so much exposed, did even more valuable service to our cause. I refer to those who day and night read the signals as they passed from station to station of the United States Army and Navy. To them we owe the preservation of Sumter, Johnson, Gregg and Wagner, on several occasions, those forts being forewarned of attacks to be made, and consequently prepared to resist the same. I have so far spoken only of the services of the corps in the siege of this city, having been connected only with this and the Signal Corps of the Army of Tennessee, and I know that my time is limited, and there are but few of those present who were at any time connected with the latter army, but will add that to demonstrate that the members of the Sign
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
—Bureau plan of Mr. Secretary Corwin—an echo of the British system of coinage, not offensively, but simply ignoring it—he formulated a measure regulating the coinage, which passed the Senate unanimously, without debate, precisely as he wrote it and upon his sole ipse dixit. Next, but after some delay, this identical measure passed the House of Representatives and became a law in February, 1853—to remain the law of the land without question or cavil from Presidents Pierce, Buchanan, Lincoln, Johnson and Grant. Such was his power in the United States Senate in a period of fierce party strife on a great organic and economic question, opposing, as he did then, the Secretary's recommendation. I have heard or read this coinage debate from 1874, when it began, till now, over twenty years of parliamentary struggle, and if I were called upon to name a document which best expounds the true principles of finance and statesmanship on this difficult subject, and in a perfectly unanswerable man
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ps, for the promptness and unanimity with which they have re-enlisted for the war. Colonel Hoke, from wounds received in battle, was disabled for field service, and was appointed for the post at Charlotte. Lieutenant-Colonel John Ashford was promoted to the command of the regiment; Major George W. Flowers to be lieutenant-colonel, and Captain J. T. Wilson to be major. The regiment was engaged in a very hard-fought battle at Ream's Station, when the divisions under Wilcox, Mahone and Johnson attacked the enemy and captured about 2,000 prisoners. Hill attacked General Warren at the Davis house, on the Weldon road, three miles from the city, August 21, 1864, defeating him and capturing 2,700 prisoners. The regiment suffered severely in this engagement. The command remained around Petersburg until April 2, 1865, when the Confederate lines were pierced in three places. The 38th was ordered out of the works, and was soon thereafter on the retreat from Petersburg. The enemy were p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
he death penalty for them. The trial never came off, but for all that, Jefferson Davis returned, the people's idol—the great chieftain of the South. And so he remains to this day. In October, 1865, Mr. Semmes went to Washington and saw President Johnson. The President asked him what he had done for the South? Mr. Semmes answered: All that a man could do, by words and deeds, to promote the Confederate cause, and now he wanted to resume in peace the practice of his profession. Well, go home and work, said Mr. Johnson. He immediately returned to New Orleans, having borrowed $100 for that purpose, not being possessed of another cent in the world. His palatial home in this city, with its fine furniture and mirrors, and magnificent library, had been confiscated when the city fell into the hands of the Federal forces, under General Butler. He resumed the practice of his profession in partnership with Mr. Mott, and rapidly rose to the head of the Louisiana bar. The principal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
l, Gen. D. H., 107, 156. Hill, Major J. C., 14. Hobson, Col. Edwin L., 105. Hoke, Col. W. J., 258, 261. Holmes, Gen. J. H.,4, 215. Hopkins, George, 377. Howletts, Charge at, 12. Hunter, R. M. T., Sketch of, 193. Hyman, Col. J. H., 263. Iverson, Gen., Alfred, 165. Jackson, Gen. T. J., His Career and Character, 91; his corps, English estimate of, 92: fatal wounding of, 256; incidents in his life at West Point, 309; in a duel, 312; death of, 328. Jenkins, Gen. M, 7. Johnson, Gen. B. R., 13, 19, 90. Johnson, Gen. B. T., 173. Johnson, Gen., Edward, 170. Johnston, Gen. Joseph E., 154, 157, 161; his negotiations with Sherman, 272. Jones, Lt.-Col., killed, 9. Jordan, Col. R. D., 166. Jordan, Surgeon, killed, 165. Jordan, Capt., Wm., 17. Kemper, Col. Del., 7. Kernstown, Battle of. 314. Knight, Capt. J. S., killed, 166. Knox, Myra E., 323. Lamb, Hon., John, 208. Laughton, Jr., Capt. John E., 347. Lee Camp, No. 1., C. V., 91. Lee, Gen., Fitzhugh