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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 185 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 94 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 80 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 75 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Edward Johnson or search for Edward Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
rts from him. On April 29th Lee replied that his request could not be complied with, but suggested his union with General Edward Johnson, who had some thirty-five hundred men near Staunton. Lee was anxious to gain success in the Valley, because it wd possibly destroy McDowell, then at Fredericksburg. Banks had some twenty thousand men at Harrisonburg watching General Edward Johnson, and six thousand men, under Milroy and Schenck, had moved west of the mountains, and were in front of Johnson, wJohnson, while Fremont was marching with ten thousand men to join them. Evading Banks at Harrisonburg, Jackson moved to Staunton, joined his force with Johnson's, and defeated Milroy and Schenck; Ewell marched then from Gordonsville to the Valley, and BanJohnson's, and defeated Milroy and Schenck; Ewell marched then from Gordonsville to the Valley, and Banks fell back to Strasburg. Jackson, having disposed of the two Federal commanders, returned with great swiftness, united with Ewell, defeated the Federal forces at Front Royal, and then pushed on with great rapidity to attack Banks, who, hearing of
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
the work, and at half-past 4 in the morning, with Barlow's and Birney's divisions in advance, successfully and gallantly stormed the position, capturing General Edward Johnson, one of Ewell's division commanders, between three and four thousand prisoners, and twenty pieces of artillery. Lee had detected the weak point, and hnt was preparing for another move, and that night ordered most of the cannon out of the salient so as to be ready for a counter move, all of which a deserter from Johnson's line reported, and which may account for the assault which, though favored by a climatic condition, was courageously executed. Johnson during the night, becomiJohnson during the night, becoming suspicious of ominous sounds in his front, ordered them back, but was attacked before getting them in position. The famous salient has been called the bloody angle. Some trenches almost ran with blood, while others had to be cleared of dead bodies. The lips of the dead were incrusted with powder from biting cartridges. It wa
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
toast to, 222. Jackson, General Thomas J., notice of, 47; mentioned, 133, 135, 137, 140, 141, 144, 153, 155, 157, 165, 177, 181, 186, 187, 190, 191, 201, 209, 211, 224, 228, 232, 245, 246; his last note, 249; last words, 252; death at Chancellorsville, 252; last order, 252. Jackson, General H. R., 118, 123. Jefferson, Thomas, 6, 10, 32. Jenkins's cavalry brigade, 263, 265; at Gettysburg, 297. Jesup, General Thomas S., 134. Johnson, General, Bushrod, mentioned, 347. Johnson, General, Edward, 116, 143; captured, 335. Johnson, Marmaduke, 90. Johnson, Reverdy, mentioned, 85; offers to defend Lee, 401. Johnston, Colonel S., mentioned, 300. Johnston, General, Albert Sidney, notice of, 47 ; mentioned, 54, 102, 133, 134. Johnston, General Joseph E., mentioned, 9, 38, 47, 48, 54, 101, 104, 110, III, 116, 132, 133, 134, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 146, 147, 148; promoted, 133; wounded, 149; praised, 369; to oppose Sherman, 372; letter to Mrs. Lee, 416. Johnston, Pe