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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 185 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 94 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 80 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 75 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Edward Johnson or search for Edward Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 6 document sections:

h of history justifies Mr. Breckinridge's doubt. Lincoln's election did more than divide the Union. It consolidated the South. After the result was known, politics turned into a game of partners. The Young Bell Ringers maintained their organization for a while. Their organization, in changing the current of its partisanship, soon amalgamated with their Democratic rivals. All the young voters of 1860 melted into one party. It was the party of the South; a party with one cry and one purpose. It gave out an insistent note, swelling from day to day into larger volume—the cry for an independent Confederacy. Over all these—whether Young Bell Ringers or Breckinridge and Lane men, or Douglas and Johnson clubs-hovered a glorified radiance from the Confederacy that was to be! I leave here the workers in the political campaign of 1860. In May that campaign had divided upon party interests. In January it was to unite in one controlling, dominating interest of State and section
on for the election of members of the convention as soon as may be passed with due regard to time, to whom shall be communicated the responsibility of determining that position and shaping that policy, so far as affects the relations of Louisiana to the Federal government. Before the legislature met there had come, filtering through, the totals of the Louisiana election. A mere mention suffices here. Breckinridge and Lane had received 22,681 votes; Bell and Everett 20,204; Douglas and Johnson 7,625; Lincoln and Hamlin were voteless. Like Gallio, the supporters of the different candidates now cared for none of these things. The Lincoln election had wiped out, as by an all-spreading sponge, any solicitude for the votes in the various States of the South. With the meeting of the legislature the adjutantgen-eral of the State submitted his report. He looked at the matter gloomily, holding that the sum absolutely needed to organize and arm the militia of the State will reach $1,
in action till ammunition failed. While wait. ing for a new supply, the enemy swarmed about them, pouring in volley after volley at fifty yards. Then, after the last regiment and last battery were from the field, the Fifth company grimly retired in perfect line. The loss of the artillery was 5 killed and wounded. Lieutenant Chalaron, for distinguished gallantry, was appointed on the field as temporary chief of artillery. Lieutenants Blair and Leverich, Corporals Smith and Adams, and Privates Johnson and Walsh, were commended for gallantry. In these fights, Randall Lee Gibson gave proofs of that signal ability which was to mark him progressively during the war. Gibson was always the student among our brigadiers, but this is far from meaning that he was a dreamer in action. He was a student only in the scholarship which he had borne away from ambitious competitors in the prizes of peace at Yale. His classics in nothing detracted from his dash upon the field, however much Plutarc
heirs. Heard the loudest with each victorious advance, it told once again how an army fights when grief inspires valor. In the reorganization which followed the death of Jackson the Louisiana brigades remained in the old Second corps, under General Ewell. Early's division included, besides Hays' Louisiana brigade, Gen. William Smith's Virginia brigade, R. F. Hoke's Carolinians and John B. Gordons' Georgians. The old Stonewall division, including Nicholls' brigade, was under Maj.—Gen. Edward Johnson. Hays' regiments were commanded: the Fifth by Maj. Alexander Hart, Sixth by Lieut.-Col. Joseph Hanlon, Seventh by Col. D. B. Penn, Eighth by Col. T. D. Lewis, Ninth by Col. L. A. Stafford. Nicholls' brigade was led by Col. J. M. Williams, and the regiments were commanded: First by Lieut.-Col. M. Nolan, Second by Lieut.-Col. R. E. Burke, Tenth by Maj. T. N. Powell, Fourteenth by Lieut.-Col. David Zable, Fifteenth by Maj. Andrew Brady. Col. J. M. Walton, still in command of Longstr
of General Milroy was gallantly met by the Second and Tenth Louisiana, who afterward led by General Johnson in person captured 1,000 prisoners and a stand of colors. The brigade loss was 2 killed anrk, near the Susquehanna river and the capital of Pennsylvania, 75 miles north of Washington. Johnson's division crossed at Boteler's ford and marched to Carlisle, still further north, and west of Federal line. To the east of that was Culp's hill, faced by Nicholls' brigade, on the right of Johnson's line. The two Louisiana brigades waited all day, expecting orders to assault, which were notd for some time been thundering against the strong Federal position. Finally, about 7 o'clock, Johnson was ordered to the assault and his men advanced gallantly up the sides of a rugged and rocky moing entirely unsupported on the right, were attended with more loss than success. As soon as Johnson was engaged Early ordered forward his assaulting line, Hays on the right, Avery's North Carolin
his loss of 3 generals killed, 4 wounded and 2 captured, Ewell remarked: Gen. Edward Johnson once said of General Stafford that he was the bravest man he ever saw. Snia Court House on the 8th, orders were received transferring Hays' brigade to Johnson's division, and consolidating both Louisiana brigades under General Hays. Butby danger, broke through a part of our line, enveloping the salient held by Edward Johnson, and capturing Johnson and Steuart and 2,000 of the division, including manJohnson and Steuart and 2,000 of the division, including many of the battle-worn Louisiana brigade. But on the second line Hancock was checked and partly driven back. It was a day of fierce fighting on both sides. In thisy prepared, and lost nearly 1,000 of his 6,000 men. Next day the remnant of Edward Johnson's division, in which the Louisianians still maintained the forms of their bight of the line, May 15th, a section of the artillery was thrown forward with Johnson and Hagood, and the Louisiana gunners found themselves opposed to six or eight