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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 185 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 94 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 80 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 75 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Edward Johnson or search for Edward Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
e American or Irish influence predominated, the sentiments of these people favored the cause of the Loyalists. Parton's Life of Jackson p. 76. But, as Judge Johnson, in his Life of Greene, says, fortunately the enemy were too confident in themselves or had too much contempt for their opponents to act with moderation or pol opposed in an engagement by undisciplined militia. It had a most salutary effect on the destinies of the State. The accounts of this affair I have taken from Dr. Johnson's Traditions. Colonel Lee—Light Horse Harry, whose memoirs were edited and re-published by his nephew, our beloved leader, Robert E. Lee—tells us that Houk, who Who could live in a land abounding in scenes of such ennobling reminiscences and not be touched by the fire of patirotism. The great old English philosopher, Dr. Johnson, in his Journey to the Western Islands, has observed that that man is little to be envied whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Narrative of the service of Colonel Geo. A. Porterfield in Northwestern Virginia in 1861-1861, (search)
ptain McChesney's, Rockbridge; Captain Flournoy's, Ashland; Captain Smith's, Ashland. Colonel Edward Johnson's Twelfth Georgia and Colonel Stephen Lee's North Carolina were on the march to join himf War the formation of a regiment out of certain fragments and odd companies, then under General Edward Johnson on Alleghany Mountain, for my command. This, it seems, required the sanction of the StaLoring's command was then sent elsewhere, he himself to Mississippi. I then reported to General Edward Johnson, whose command was about fifteen miles west of Staunton. General Johnson assigned me tGeneral Johnson assigned me to the command of a brigade, composed of the remnant of the Twenty-fifth Virginia, Thirty first Virginia, Twelfth Georgia, Hansboro's battalion, and a battery of artillery. I remained in this positioinning, I concluded to abide by this result and remain out of the service, which I did. General Edward Johnson, without solicitation from me, gave me a letter to the Secretary of War, recommending my
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Wee Nee volunteers of Williamsburg District, South Carolina, in the First (Hagood's) regiment. (search)
casualties. One man swam to Mount Pleasant, almost entirely across the harbor, another to Fort Sumter, and the rest were taken off by another boat. September 1st, 1863.—Orders received this morning directing me to conduct the Twenty-fifth to Johnson, there to take steamer tonight for the purpose of being transferred to Morris Island to constitute a part of the garrison of Fort Wagner, relieving one of the regiments in that fort. These orders were not this time countermanded, and the regimey's land batteries, were incessantly poured into the fort. These, with the fire of the 15-inch guns of the monitors, and the sixteen 11-inch broadside and 200-pound Parrott bow and stern guns of the Ironsides, added to the thunders of Moultrie, Johnson, and the batteries on James and Sullivan's Islands, made an artillery fight the fury and grandeur of which can hardly be conceived. It is beyond my powers of description, surpassing the most highly-colored accounts which I have ever heard. No
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Thirty-eighth Virginia (Steuart's brigade) at battle of five Forks. (search)
. M., and engaged the enemy about 2 P. M., driving him until dark stopped operations. The regiment did not become actively engaged. The enemy bringing up a heavy force of infantry at night, the command commenced falling back at 4 1/2 A. M. on the 1st of April: halting at Five Forks, it proceeded to throw up rifle-pits. The enemy attacked in the evening, first with cavalry, but finally bringing his infantry into action. Every front attack was successfully repulsed, but with Pickett's and Johnson's divisions of infantry and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, to oppose thirty-five thousand infantry and all of Sheridan's cavalry, the contest was too unequal. Early in the action Colonel Griggs (with the Thirty-eighth) was ordered from his brigade, and to go to the left of Brigadier-General Ransom, which he did at a double quick. Finding no troops but a few cavalrymen, who left to join (they said) their command, he deployed his regiment into single file, and opened a destructive fire upon the en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field Telegrams from around Petersburg, Virginia. (search)
on Wilcox for a brigade, as instructed. G. T. Beauregard. near Petersburg, Va., Aug. 20th, 1864—7 P. M. General R. E. Lee. Chaffin's Bluff: Expect to attack early in the morning. Have already taken one brigade from Hoke and another from Johnson, extending their commands in the lines to utmost. No available force shall be left behind. Am happy to hear of Early's success. G. T. Beauregard. 21stAugust, 1864. General G. T. Anderson, Commanding Brigade, Dunlop's. Camp your brigade E. Lee. Petersburg, Va., September 11th, 1864. General G. T. Beauregard, Wilmington, N. C. : About 2 A. M. yesterday enemy broke through picket line in front of Hill's corps. It was soon restored. Loss slight. Casualties in Hoke's and Johnson's-three killed and sixteen wounded. Geo. Wm. Brent, A. A. G. Wilmington, N. C., September 12th, 1864. General R. E. Lee, Commanding, Petersburg, Va.: Everything here is in as good condition as means and circumstances will permit. Practis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roll of the Rockbridge Battery of artillery, April 10, 1865. (search)
xon, Henry. Present. Dold, Calvin M. Present. Estill, W. Present. Ford, James. Wounded. Absent. Friend, Benj. C. Present. Gibson, Robt. Present. Gilliam, Wm. Absent. Ginger, George. Absent. Ginger, W. Captured at Gettysburg. Absent. Gold, Alfred. Sick at home. Absent. Gooch,——. Present. Gordon, Wm. Wounded. Absent. Private Heischell,——. Present. Hide, E. P. Present. Hitner, John K. Sick at home. Absent. Holmes,——. Sick at home. Absent. Johnson, Thos. E. Sick at home. Absent. Kean, Otho G. Present. Lacy,——. Absent. Leathers,——. Present. Leach, James M. Present. Letcher, Samuel. Present. Lewis, Henry. Present. Lewis, James P. Present. Link, David. Sick at home. Absent. McCampbell, W. Present. McClintic, W. Present. McCorkle, T. E. Present. McCorkle, T. M. Absent. McCorkle, W. Present. McCrum, Barton. Present. McGruder, D. N. Present. McGruder, Horatio. Present.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Shiloh: refutation of the so-called lost opportunity, on the evening of April 6th, 1862. (search)
February, 1862, cause the loss of Fort Donelson from the outset with the ten thousand troops sent thither after the capture of Fort Henry, and thus make the immediate abandonment of Bowling Green and Columbus absolutely a necessary consequence, with the early abandonment also of Nashville and Middle Tennessee? Let the issue also embrace the question, whether there was not such tardiness and hesitancy on the part of the Confederate movement from Murfreesboro to Corinth, that the junction of Johnson's forces with those of Beauregard at that point, late in March, 1862, was a sheer casualty, due to the want of enterprise on the part of the Federal general to so interpose the forces at his disposition between the divided fragments of his adversary as to make their concentration at Corinth an impossibility? That is to say, was it not in the power of the Confederate commander-in-chief to have assembled his forces a week earlier than he did, and therefore been in the condition to fight Gene
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga, 19th and 20th of September, 1863. (search)
giment were heavy. Among the gallant men who fell that day was Captain W. A. Williams, Company F, who was acting major of the regiment when he was killed. He was an excellent officer and an estimable man, and his death is a serious loss not only to his company, but to the regiment. Among the most seriously wounded were Lieutenants Pitts and Cunningham, each of whom lost a leg by amputation. They are, therefore, unfortunately lost to the service. Captains Richardson and Swygort and Lieutenant Johnson were severely wounded. Captain Todd, acting Lieutenant-Colonel, and Adjutant Y. I. Pope were also severely wounded. Other officers were slightly wounded whose names will appear on the accompanying list of casualties. After Adjutant Pope was wounded, I detailed Lieutenant John W. Watts to act in his place. He and Sergeant-Major E. M. Hix were of great assistance, and discharged the duties of their offices with entire satisfaction to me. The conduct of officers and men generally was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ohn, 273. Forts Breckinridge, 64; Donelson, 318, 368; Henry, 318; Johnson, 118,158, 170; McHenry, 423; Moultrie, 12, 156, 158, 159, 172; Picegory, Sergeant E. S., 91. Green, 359. Green, Gen. Nath'l, 12; Johnson's Life of, 6. Grier, Lt., 143. Griggs, Col., Geo. K., 230, 257Chasseurs, 448. Jenkins, Lt. J. M, 20. Jervey, Henry, 34 Johnson, Gen. B. R , 183, 231. Johnson, Col. Edward, 88, 90. Johnson, LJohnson, Lt., 379. Johnson, Lt. Polk G., 107, 349. Johnson's Tour, cited, 14. Johnson's Traditions of S. C., 9. Johnston, Gen. A. S., 69, 274,Johnson, Lt. Polk G., 107, 349. Johnson's Tour, cited, 14. Johnson's Traditions of S. C., 9. Johnston, Gen. A. S., 69, 274, 308, 317. Johnston. Gen. Jos. E., 25, 68; Narrative, cited, 85, 98,204; forces of in 1862, 256, 294, 308. Johnston, Major, J. Stoddard, Johnson's Tour, cited, 14. Johnson's Traditions of S. C., 9. Johnston, Gen. A. S., 69, 274, 308, 317. Johnston. Gen. Jos. E., 25, 68; Narrative, cited, 85, 98,204; forces of in 1862, 256, 294, 308. Johnston, Major, J. Stoddard, 58, 61, 68. Johnston, Col., Wm. Preston, 309, 317. Jones, Cadwalader, 19, 20, 21. Jones, Col., Charles, 304. Jones, Jr., Col. C. C., addrJohnson's Traditions of S. C., 9. Johnston, Gen. A. S., 69, 274, 308, 317. Johnston. Gen. Jos. E., 25, 68; Narrative, cited, 85, 98,204; forces of in 1862, 256, 294, 308. Johnston, Major, J. Stoddard, 58, 61, 68. Johnston, Col., Wm. Preston, 309, 317. Jones, Cadwalader, 19, 20, 21. Jones, Col., Charles, 304. Jones, Jr., Col. C. C., address of, 270. Jones, E., 96. Jones, Capt., Elcan, 91, 98. Jones, Capt F. C., 306. Jones, Gen., 393. Jones, J. W , 175. Jones, Rev. D