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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 185 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 94 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 80 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 75 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Edward Johnson or search for Edward Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Black Eagle Company. (search)
nt, exempted from service, 1862; dead. Jackson, P. H., exempted from service, 1862; dead. Johnson, Columbus, on detail service; dead. Johnson, E. A., killed at Seven Pines, Va., 1st June, 18Johnson, E. A., killed at Seven Pines, Va., 1st June, 1862. Johnson, E. S. Johnson, Howard, came as a substitute in the winter of 1861; deserted near Williamsburg, Va., May 1862; evidently a spy. Johnson, Lyttleton T., wounded at Frayser's Farm, Johnson, E. S. Johnson, Howard, came as a substitute in the winter of 1861; deserted near Williamsburg, Va., May 1862; evidently a spy. Johnson, Lyttleton T., wounded at Frayser's Farm, Va., 1st July, 1862. Martin, Austin, killed at Manassas, Va., 21st July, 1861. Mayo, Joseph H., transferred to Cavalry, 1862. Mayo, William H., transferred to Cavalry, 1862; dead. Morton,Johnson, Howard, came as a substitute in the winter of 1861; deserted near Williamsburg, Va., May 1862; evidently a spy. Johnson, Lyttleton T., wounded at Frayser's Farm, Va., 1st July, 1862. Martin, Austin, killed at Manassas, Va., 21st July, 1861. Mayo, Joseph H., transferred to Cavalry, 1862. Mayo, William H., transferred to Cavalry, 1862; dead. Morton, James, killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Page, William Nelson, killed at Manassas, Va., 1861, July 21st. Pendleton, E. H., on detail service during the war; dead. Pettit, Lucius H., killed nJohnson, Lyttleton T., wounded at Frayser's Farm, Va., 1st July, 1862. Martin, Austin, killed at Manassas, Va., 21st July, 1861. Mayo, Joseph H., transferred to Cavalry, 1862. Mayo, William H., transferred to Cavalry, 1862; dead. Morton, James, killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Page, William Nelson, killed at Manassas, Va., 1861, July 21st. Pendleton, E. H., on detail service during the war; dead. Pettit, Lucius H., killed near Petersburg, Va., 1864. Ryals, James D., served as courier to General Pickett. Sclater, Richard O., wounded at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. Spencer, John M., (volunteer), wounded at Gaines' M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
hed Carlisle on the 27th, with two divisions, Johnson's and Rodes', while Early was deflected to ths marching and fighting, and he was told that Johnson's division, the only one of his corps not eng was close to the town, that he proposed with Johnson to take possession of a wooded hill, which co been seriously engaged. Lane's brigade with Johnson's battery was looking out for Buford's cavalr About 5 P. M., a cannonade was directed from Johnson's front against Cemetery Hill, followed by any's brigades, taking up the movement begun by Johnson, also penetrated the enemy's lines, bringing an hour's fighting. The attack was begun by Johnson on the left a little before dark and taken up of Little and Big Round Top. On the left, Johnson had captured a considerable line of breastworstreet. In compliance with Ewell's orders, Johnson was about to do so, when he himself was attacell in his report says that a half hour after Johnson attacked and when it was too late to recall h[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
. I believe the unbiased man must say this was patriotism, although he can, if he wishes, reconcile his conscience by calling it misguided patriotism. And you may be surprised to know that these young villains have generally developed into good citizens and successful men. Go where you will through our State, and you will find them respected and at the head of the communities in which they live. In business I can name you a dozen of the leading houses in this city whose members were with Johnson and McCausland, when your city was burned. The bar throughout the State is full of them; and they are, in many cases, among the leaders of their circuits. They are doctors in good standing in their profession; and many of the most thrifty farmers in this State, whose fine farms attest devotion to duty and to home, especially in such counties as Howard and Montgomery, were also present on that occasion. In addition to our regiment there were five or six others in the brigade, most of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
ity, returned to Fredericksburg, and to-night left on a special train for Washington en route to Gettysburg to spend a day before returning home. This double unveiling took place on the anniversary of one of Remarkable conflict. the most remarkable conflicts in all war annals. Forty-five years ago to-day General Hancock's corps was in line of battle at the Landram house, and half a mile away, at the crest of the rising ground on which is called the Bloody Angle battlefield, General Edward Johnson's division of the Confederate army lay entrenched awaiting an attack. General Grant's order to General Hancock was to move upon the Confederate works at 4 o'clock in the morning of that day. Under cover of darkness and fog, Hancock's men got within a hundred yards of the Confederate line before they were discovered, and then began one of the most sanguinary battles of the war. The Confederate line was broken and driven back by Hancock's columns which afterwards, being reinforced, ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
ivision in line, Munford covering its left flank, W. H. F. Lee its right flank, and Rosser in reserve on the other side of Hatcher's Run. Between this line and the fortified line at Burgess' Mill, held by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, with Johnson's division, was a gap of several miles in width, only picketed by Roberts' small command. Sheridan, reinforced by Warren with his corps, that had been placed under his command, advanced, and, by 3 P. M., had uncovered Fitz Lee's line. Havingers. Warren then arranged his corps so as to preclude the possibility of these forces reuniting with the body of the army. It had happened that Fitz Lee, during the day, notified Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, who was at Burgess' Mill with Johnson's division, that the Fifth Corps was with Sheridan, and that Sheridan, now with overwhelming force, was pressing upon him. Anderson, in person, with Wise's and Gracie's brigades, moved to his relief, but as Warren had already crossed the White
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
S. Mosby. By Randolph Harrison McKIM, late First Lieutenant and A. D. C. Third Brigade, General Edward Johnson's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. Col. John S. Mosby, the brave and able command was written on the 27th, and received by Ewell early on the morning of the 28th, why did Gen. Edward Johnson's division not receive orders to march back southward from Carlisle till 9 A. M., on the 29th, as my diary proves? (I was a staff officer in Johnson's division and kept a careful diary of the campaign). But, if it was written on the 28th, dispatched at midnight, and received by Ewell by 6 or 7 A. M., of the 29th, orders to Gen. Edward Johnson and to Gen. Rodes might well have been issued as early as 9 A. M. Again, if Ewell received the order on the morning of the 29th, it exactlthe General Commanding to join the main body of the army at Cashtown. Again, it appears that Johnson's reserve artillery and trains were passing through Chambersburg after midnight of the 29th. Mr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. (search)
earer, John Ridgely, stripped our beloved flag from its staff, placed it in his haversack, and carried it with him to Albemarle county, Va. The men scattered in every direction. About April 15, while riding along the road, I was invited by a boy to the house of his mother, a widow, who owned a small place in Deep Gully, through which ran a small stream called Hickory Creek. Here I remained until April 24. On that date I started for our appointed rendezvous, met Lieutenant Ditty and Private Johnson, of our command, on the road, and together we crossed the Blue Ridge at Rockfish Gap. Upon reaching Waynesboro I left them and proceeded five miles farther to the Cattle Scales. Here I found that a number of our boys had already assembled. By 10 o'clock next morning nearly every member of the command which had marched to Lynchburg was present. Colonel Dorsey then formed us in line and said: General Munford has ordered me to meet him at Salem, Roanoke county, with my battalion.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 369. Hodges, Col. James G., 184; where he fell, 195. Hoffman, Fred., of Color Guard, 275. Hooker. Gen. Joseph, 82,98. Huidekoper, H. S, 290. Huse, Col. Caleb, 2. Iron-clad car exploded by shot, 354. Iverson, Gen. A., 17. Johnson's Division, 173. Johnson, Capt. Elliot, 213. Johnston, Gen., 18. Jones' Battalion of Artillery, 328. Jones, Col. Beuhring, 349. Jones Col. H. P., 176, Jones, Lieut. J. Pembroke, 51. Kane, Dr. E. K., 42 Kieffer, Henry M., Johnson, Capt. Elliot, 213. Johnston, Gen., 18. Jones' Battalion of Artillery, 328. Jones, Col. Beuhring, 349. Jones Col. H. P., 176, Jones, Lieut. J. Pembroke, 51. Kane, Dr. E. K., 42 Kieffer, Henry M., 299. Kenny, Lt. Col., 16. Lamb, Col. Wm., 3. Lawson. Gallant exploit of Capt. Campbell. 320. Lehman, Franklin W., 273. Logan. Mrs. John A., 366. Lomax, Gen. L. L., 177. Longstreet, Gen. Old Pete, 78, 126. Lumpkin, Rev. J. T., 266, 282. Lee's, Gen. last camp, 208. Lee, Gen. Fitz., 35. Lee, Gen R. E. 21, 31. Lee Gen. W. H. F., 35, 69. Lincoln dejected at Lee's escape, 75; course of, inconsistent, 362. McAlwee, G. W. 354. McAnerny, Capt. John, 200. M