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ls, and persuaded others to join them. Most memorable of all the meetings held in aid of recruiting the Fifty-fourth was that at the Joy Street Church, Boston, on the evening of February 16, which was enthusiastic and largely attended. Robert Johnson, Jr., presided; J. R. Sterling was the Vice-President, and Francis Fletcher Secretary. In opening, Mr. Johnson stated the object of the gathering. He thought that another year would show the importance of having the black man in arms, and plMr. Johnson stated the object of the gathering. He thought that another year would show the importance of having the black man in arms, and pleaded with his hearers, by the love they bore their country, not to deter by word or deed any person from entering the service. Judge Russell said in his remarks, You want to be line-officers yourselves. He thought they had a right to be, and said,— If you want commissions, go, earn, and get them. [Cheers.] Never let it be said that when the country called, this reason kept back a single man, but go cheerfully. Edward L. Pierce was the next speaker; and he reminded them of the many e
d and fifty men for grand guard, reporting to Col. Jos. R. Hawley, Seventh Connecticut, field-officer of the trenches. This was the first detail other than fatigue since July 21. The detachment relieved troops in the second parallel. During the night it was very stormy, the rain standing in pools in the trenches. But few shots were fired. Charleston's bells could be heard when all was still. At midnight the Swamp Angel again opened on the city. About 10 A. M., on the 24th, Wagner and Johnson both opened on us, the former with grape and canister sweeping the advanced works. In the camp, by reason of rain and high tides, the water was several inches deep in the tents on lowest ground. A new brigade—the Fourth—was formed on the 24th, composed of the Second South Carolina, Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, and Third United States Colored Troops (the latter a new regiment from the north), under Colonel Montgomery. About dark on the 25th a force was again advanced against the enemy's
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 7: bombardment of Charleston. (search)
Fifty-fourth. Its receipt on October 2 was attended with great enthusiasm, the rousing cheers of the men being heard for a mile around. It was noticeable about the 1st of October that our fire was stronger than for several weeks upon Sumter, Johnson, and Moultrie. Two monitors were doing picket duty near the island. The monotony of daily events was broken at 10 A. M., October 5, by the sound of the long-roll. Shots had been heard among the naval vessels. Our regiment took position inart of the harbor obstructions. We were now firing an average of twenty shells each day into Charleston. The time of firing was purposely varied throughout the day and night, that the Confederates might not be prepared to reply. From Mother Johnson, Simkins, and Moultrie we received an average of two hundred shots per day, most of which failed to strike our works. But few casualties were sustained, the warning cry of the lookouts sending all to cover. Against Sumter our firing was ligh
ed near Battery Simkins, and was at once repulsed. Colonel Hoyt, Fifty-second Pennsylvania, and a number of his officers and men, were not supported by their comrades, but landing, captured the Brook's gun battery. They then pressed on toward Johnson under heavy fire, before which they were obliged to retire to the captured battery where they all surrendered. The retreating boats communicated their disorder to those carrying the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh; and they too fell back againstand power of command on the part of subordinate officers. Captain Homans with the Fifty-fourth companies at Black Island was ordered to cross in boats to James Island, and attack toward Secessionville, to co-operate with the movement against Johnson. Preparations were made, and the boats transported across the island in accordance with specific instructions; but in transit, without proper means, they were so damaged as to make their use impracticable, and the expedition necessarily impossi
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
field. 23 Oct. 63; 21 Sep 65 Boston. $325. Johnson, Nathaniel H. 24, mar.; carpenter; Sheffield. 16 Feb. 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Johnson, Norman 22, sin.; farmer; Sheffield. 26 Feb 63; rejected.ug 64 Morris Id, S. C.; dis. —— Westfield. Johnson, Peter B. 29, mar.; turner; Springfield. 4 MMch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Wilkes Barre, Pa. Johnson, Isaac. 22, sin.; farmer; So. Reading. 14 JMch 63; missing Jly 18 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Johnson, William 29, mar.; farmer; Montrose, Pa. 21 Mochester, N. Y. 18 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Johnson, John Henry 16, sin.; farmer; Lanesville, Va.mer; Hadley. 23 Nov. 63; 20 Aug 65. $325. Johnson, Charles F. 20, sin.; farmer; Chicago. 21 Ap Id. S. C. accidentally shot by guard. $50. Johnson, Joseph C. 31, sin.; farmer; Chicago. 15 Apl 5 May 64 Morris Id. S. C. of disease. $50. Johnson, Joseph 36, mar.; laborer; Hamilton, O. 28 Ap —— —— Jackson, William 28 Nov 64 —— —— Johnson, George 26 Apl 63 Kaine, William 12 May 63
as we understood, were to be used for hanging all our colored boys. Sergt. Robert Johnson and Private Edward S. Logan, of Company F, Fifty-fifth Mass. Infantry, st made prisoners, were taken to Charleston Jail to join the Fifty-fourth men. Johnson died a prisoner; but Logan lived to be released. The following statement, mosrs were captured at our assault on Fort Wagner. I had a conversation with Sergeant Johnson (colored), Co. F, 55th Massachusetts Infantry; he was a full-blooded negrors herein, that action was suspended in their case, for the statements of both Johnson and States indicate that they believed their trial, or at least their liabilitIt is a singular fact that the date of Grover's capture is the same as that of Johnson and Logan, of the Fifty-fifth; and Botany Bay Island, where the latter were ca63. Stuart woods. Baltimore Smith. Joseph beard, Co. K. Sergeant Robert Johnson, Jr. Co. F, 55th Mass.; captured at N. Edisto Island, S. C., Nov. 12, 186
Co. Jesse Brown. Alfred Green. Cornelius Henson, Co. C. Nathaniel Hurley, Co. E. William Butler. George Mushroom. George Thomas. Solomon Anderson. H. Wm. H. Kirk, Co. H. Wm. H. Worthington, Co. H. John W. Dixon, Co. H, 54th Mass. James Caldwell. John Leatherman. Wm. H. Harrison. Joseph H. Proctor. Enos Smith. Fred Wallace. Isarael Williams. Sergeant Alfred Whiting. Co. I, captured at Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863. Stuart woods. Baltimore Smith. Joseph beard, Co. K. Sergeant Robert Johnson, Jr. Co. F, 55th Mass.; captured at N. Edisto Island, S. C., Nov. 12, 1863. Edward Logan. Co. F, 55th Mass.; captured at N. Edisto Island, S. C., Nov. 12, 1863. Oren Brown. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Johnson. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Wilson. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. Wm. Taylor. U. S. gunboat, Isaac Smith, Feb. 1863. James Mellet. U. S. Frigate Wabash; captured at Fort Sumter.
A., 97. Jenkins, Mike, 262. Jenning's Swamp, S. C., 299. Jewett, Charles, Jr., 183, 202, 205, 237, 276, 316. Jewett, R. H. L., 23, 24, 55, 85, 90, 105, 145, 164, 166, 196, 237, 316. Johassie Island, S. C., 193. John's Island, S. C., 52, 54, 144, 157, 199, 201, 208, 209, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215. Johnson, Andrew, 313. Johnson, Edward, 196. Johnson, Fort, 114, 133, 141, 203, 206, 207, 283, 315. Johnson, J. C., 293. Johnson, James, P., 302, 304. Johnson, Private, 304. Johnson, Robert, Jr., 12, 13. Johnson, Samuel, 16. Johnson, W. H., 321. Johnson's Swamp, S. C., 291. Johnston, Alexander, 34, 105, 145. Johnston, Joseph E., 307. Jones, Charles C., Jr., 252. Jones, Edward L., 34, 62, 90, 92, 145, 150, 183, 188, 202, 204, 205, 233. Jones, Iredell, 95. Jones, Samuel, 100, 185,195,208, 212, 257. Jones, Samuel, letter to Braxton Bragg, 195. Jones, sutler, 177. Joy, Charles F., 276, 291, 316, 317. Joy Street Church, 12. Junction with Western Army, 266.