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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 58 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 23 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 17 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Samuel Johnson or search for Samuel Johnson in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 3 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Edwards (search)
will commonly employed by the Arminians; is there no alternative for the human reason save submission to his theological determinism or to fatalistic atheism? One way of escape from that dilemma is obvious and well known. It is that which Dr. Johnson, with his superb faculty of common sense, seized upon when the Edwardian doctrine came up in conversation before him. The only relief I had was to forget it, said Boswell, who had read the book; and Johnson closed the discussion with his epigrJohnson closed the discussion with his epigram: All theory is against the freedom of the will, all experience for it. That is sufficient, no doubt, for the conduct of life; yet there is perhaps another way of escape, which, if it does not entirely silence the metaphysical difficulties, at least gives them a new ethical turn. Twice in the course of his argument Edwards refers to an unnamed Arminian Edwards, it should seem, had immediately in mind the Essay on the freedom of Will in God and the Creature of Isaac Watts; but the notion
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: philosophers and divines, 1720-1789 (search)
sure to browsing in forbidden fields. Before Johnson's graduation, some of the speculations and distem of divinity. It was characteristic of Johnson, brought up in the darkened chambers of Calvihe purpose of obtaining Episcopal ordination, Johnson had made a trip to England. There the young anquil vales of America. On his return home, Johnson found neither ease nor tranquillity. Coming against the Presbyterian Jonathan Dickinson, Johnson exhibits a lightness of touch which relieves letters have been recovered, for in them, as Johnson wrote, one can gather that Candour and Tendere immediate will of the Supreme Spirit. From Johnson's correspondence, then, one can gather Berkelem deemed impossible by most men of that day, Johnson's Elements was remarkable. The good bishop, Edwards that infants were like little vipers, Johnson asserted that we ought to think them of much y. Such was the ironical fate that befell Johnson. Though he had done good service against the[16 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
nal ballads in the Grub Street style, which his brother printed, and had him hawk about town. His father discountenanced these effusions, declaring that verse-makers were generally beggars ; but coming upon his son's private experiments in prose, he applied the right incentive by pointing out where the work fell short in elegance of expression, in method, and in perspicuity. About this time, says Franklin in a familiar paragraph, I met with an odd volume of the Spectator. Anticipating Dr. Johnson's advice by half a century, he gave his days and nights to painstaking study and imitation of Addison till he had mastered that style-familiar but not coarse, and elegant but not ostentatious --which several generations of English essayists have sought to attain. All the world has heard how Franklin's career as a writer began with an anonymous contribution stealthily slipped under the door of his brother's printing-house at night, and in the morning approved for publication by his brothe