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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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forces to Corinth. It is not the province of the present writer to recount his further services, but the following brief abstract from the pen of Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, who served on his staff, will here suffice: His first service was at Pensacola, where he distinguished himself as a disciplinarian, and whence he was transferred to Corinth shortly before the battle of Shiloh, having the rank of a major-general. He served with distinction at Shiloh, having been made by General Johnston his chief of staff, and, shortly after, being promoted to a full generalship, succeeded to the command of the Army of the Mississippi. In the succeeding summer, 1862, he transferred the main body of his command to Chattanooga, and planned and executed the Kentucky campaign of that year, being at the same time in command of the department embracing the territory between the Mississippi River and the Alleghany range. Notwithstanding the unpopularity which assailed him after the evacuati
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
ttle. This proved to be incorrect. About 10 1/2 o'clock A. M. I received through Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston a suggestion from the General Commanding to move against the enemy, instead of awaiting his attack. (I find that Colonel Johnston regarded it as an order, but as I moved at once it is not material.) I preferred to fight on the ground 1 then occupied, but supposing that the object of emy was supposed to be advancing. We had marched about half a mile when I received through Colonel Johnston an order from the General Commanding to send at least one brigade to the support of Lieutenced, but had not proceeded far when I received an order from the General Commanding through Colonel Johnston, repeated by Colonel Greenfell, to leave Hanson in position on the hill, and with the remai a special rear-guard. The enemy did not follow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letter from President Davis-reply to Mr. Hunter. (search)
d; the answers of the other three are annexed, and they require no explanation. The characters of those gentlemen would render worse than useless a defence against the absurd suspicion that they were employed in backbiting gossip about a visitor to the house of their chief. I remain yours, respectfully, Jefferson Davis. Letter from G. W. C. Lee. Lexington, Va., 15th January, 1878. My dear friend: I received last week your letter of the 4th instant, and showed it to Colonel Johnston, who said that he would write to you on the subject of your enquiry without delay. To the best of my recollection and belief, I never heard, before the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, of Mr. Hunter's interview with you, in the interests of peace, referred to in the letter published over his signature in the December number of the Southern Historical Society Papers, which I have just read for the first time; nor do I remember to have ever heard a word from you that could be
group of scouts who are as idle as the two armies in the Petersburg trenches. But a few weeks' work in the opening spring, as Grant maneuvers to starve Lee out of Petersburg, and the scouts' duties will be over. Sheridan will come, too, from the Shenandoah with his cavalry scouts, the finest body of information seekers developed by the War. General Grant was in a constant state of uneasiness during the winter, fearing that Lee would leave his strong lines around Petersburg and unite with Johnston. Consequently he depended on his Secret-service men to keep him informed as to any signs of movement on the part of Lee. Secret-service headquarters in the last months of the War Secret-service headquarters in the last months of the War and his reports to the Secretary were looked upon as among the most helpful that reached the department. The maintenance of the Secret Service was a large item in the conduct of the war. The expenses of the provost-marshal's office at Washingto
, and the vitally important despatch was in Beauregard's hands between eight and nine o'clock on that same night, July 16, 1861. Every outpost commander was immediately notified to fall back to the positions designated for this contingency, and Johnston in the Valley, who had likewise been informed by careful scouting parties that Patterson was making no move upon him, was able to exercise the option permitted by the Richmond authorities in favor of a swift march to Beauregard's assistance. . In the opening of the war, at least, the Confederate spy and scout system was far better developed than was the Federal. As the war went on, each commanding general relied upon his own spies and the scouts of his cavalry leader. Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston was a nephew of Albert Sidney Johnston and served on General Bragg's staff from Stone's River to Chattanooga. All through this important campaign he had charge of the secret-service orders and reports. He has related how he always ut
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ruggles' amended report of the battle of Shiloh. (search)
ichmond in time for that purpose. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Daniel Ruggles, Brigadier-General Commanding District. Letter from Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston. headquarters army of Tennessee, Tallahoma, Tennessee, April 21st, 1863. Brigadier-General Ruggles, Commanding, &c., Columbus, Mississippi: Gen Generals. He is especially pleased that you have corrected material discrepancies in the report of General Polk. I am, General, your obedient servant, J. Stoddard Johnston, A. D. C. Official: R. M. Hooe, A. A. G. Endorsement. headquarters army of Tennessee, Tallahoma, Tennessee, April 21st, 1863. Respectfully foe commanders and a mass of other testimony, and justice to his command entitles his request to consideration. Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Official: J. Stoddard Johnston, A. D. C. Official: R. M. Hooe, A. A. G. I hereby certify that the foregoing are copies of official records. Daniel Ruggles. Fredericksburg, Virgin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
a soldier, General Preston adds high character, wide influence and that chaste oratory which seems to be the natural inheritance of the Prestons, and we doubt not that we have committed the interests of the Society in Kentucky into most worthy hands. The Kentucky Branch of the Southern Historical Society was organized at Lexington, on the 9th of December, by the election of the following officers: Acting President--General William Preston. Vice-Presidents--James O. Harrison, J. Stoddard Johnston, General John S. Williams, General Basil W. Duke and General Joseph Lewis. Secretary — James A. Headly. Treasurer--Major R. S. Bullock. Executive Committee--Prof. J. D. Pickett, Colonel W. C. P. Breckinridge, Major H. B. McClellan, J. R. Morton, Esq.; Major John R. Viley, J. Soule Smith, Esq.; F. K. Hunt, Esq.; Major P. P. Johnston, Major B. G. Thomas, J. P. Metcalf, Esq.; G. W. Ranck, Esq.; Colonel C. C. Morgan, Lee Bradley, Esq., and James A. Grinstead, Esq. The following
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Monocacy-report of General John B. Gordon. (search)
l John B. Gordon. [It was eclipsed at the time by other stirring events, but there was scarcely a more gallant fight made during the war than that in which, after a march of fourteen miles that morning, General Early defeated General Lew Wallace at Monocacy. Our readers will he glad to see the report of the battle given by Major-General John B. Gordon, who bore the brunt of the battle with his accustomed skill and gallantry.] headquarters Gordon's division, July 22d, 1864. Major J. Stoddard Johnston, Assistant Adjutant-General, Breckinride's Corps: Major — In accordance with orders from corps headquarters I have the honor to submit the following report. About 2 1/2 P. M., 9th of July, I was ordered by Major-General Breckinridge, commanding corps, to move my division to the right and cross the Monocacy about one mile below the bridge and ford (on the Georgetown pike), which were then held by the enemy, On reaching the river I directed my brigade commanders to cross as rap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. By Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, of his Staff. No. 1--from Dalton, Georgia, to Hanover Junction, Virginia. [Our readers will receive with great interest the following sketches from the facile pen of the gallant soldier whose position on the staff gave him special opportunities for knowing whereof he affirms.] While the Army of Tennessee was in winter quarters at Dalton, Georgia, General Breckinridge was, early in February, 1864, going in advance to make better disposition for their transfer by rail from Staunton to Hanover Junction, a distance of near one hundred miles. The energy and promptness of his movement were such that, notwithstanding the inferior facilities for transportation at that time in the South, his whole command,, including artillery, was at Hanover Junction on the 20th. The Augusta reserves being disbanded, the cadets returned to Lexington and Imboden left to watch the Valley. J. Stoddard Johnston.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. By Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, of his Staff. No. 2. General Breckinridge's arrival at Hanover Junction was opportune. General Lee was still at Spotsylvania Courthouse, thirty-five miles north. The railroad from Hanover Junction was that to which he looked for supplies of all kinds and communication with Richmond. Knowing this, General Grant had sent Sheridan, with a large cavalry force, to make a raid in Lee's rear and to destroy his communications — particularly to burn the large bridge over the South Anna river, near Hanover Junction. It was in this raid that General Jeb Stuart was killed. Breckinridge's arrival secured the bridge, and Sheridan returned without having effected other material damage. On the 22d of May, General Lee, having fallen back from Spotsylvania, arrived at Hanover Junction, and in person thanked and complimented General Breckinridge for his victory. In fact the whole Army of Northern Vi
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