Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Joe Johnston or search for Joe Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 5 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
loss on the Confederate side, as reported by the rebel general, Joe Johnston, was 1,897. He naively concludes his report in that regard withecause they saw the cars coming in from Harper's Ferry loaded with Johnston's troops of the Army of the Shenandoah, and so they gave up all fohe general idea of the people to this day is that the coming up of Johnston's army from Harper's Ferry on the afternoon of the battle as a sur the loss of Bull Run. Now, the reports on both sides show that Johnston evaded Patterson at Harper's Ferry in obedience to an order sent h19th, and were in front of McDowell on the 20th; and so far from Joe Johnston's men coming into the action late on the 21st, and our men runni addition to all these disadvantages of the conduct of the battle, Johnston's force had been allowed by Patterson to escape him entirely, and following him up. If he had followed him up he could have been in Johnston's rear or on the left flank of the rebel army at the battle of Bul
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
arranted in believing the assertion of Beauregard in his official report that the whole number of the army at Manassas was less than 30,000 after the junction of Johnston. Suppose the whole number of regiments to be filled up, taking the highest number from each State, then the whole army raised by the Confederate States, wherethin the succeeding six months. My conclusion was that there were not more than sixty-five thousand effective troops opposite Washington. The rebel general, Joe Johnston, moved off his troops in March, just before McClellan made his movement from Washington against them, and Johnston's report as published in the War correspondeJohnston's report as published in the War correspondence now shows that I was not five thousand out of the way, not reckoning the small force that was below Alexandria. But I did not include the Quaker guns, i. e. the wooden ones, that were mounted in the rebel intrenchments near Centralville, and McClellan's bureau of information had evidently included in their estimate the number
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
rsburg with his main army and go down to join Johnston against Sherman; and he feared very much that1865, Sherman entered into a negotiation with Johnston for the surrender of his army, and according to military usage he agreed with Johnston on a truce and the cessation of all hostilities between the United States forces and Johnston's army until the negotiation should be finished. The two generamet and entered into a convention under which Johnston should surrender his army. It was agreed to by Johnston and signed provisionally by Sherman and forwarded to Washington for acceptance. The w through General Grant with instructions that Johnston should be held to surrender on the same termst point from which those armies could move on Johnston and join Sherman in case the negotiations fairginia, and ordered Meade's armies to move on Johnston, notwithstanding the existence of the truce. published the order. Afterwards finding that Johnston's army had been surrendered, and being about
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
y confiscated and given to Northern soldiers Johnston's terms of surrender to Sherman drawn by the s of occupation. The terms of surrender of Johnston's army agreed to by Sherman See Appendix Ny acted. They were informed of the fact that Johnston called to his assistance the cabinet of Jeff differently so as to make it his own, or, as Johnston says, to make it fuller, and he adds that Sheof the original draft of Sherman's terms with Johnston, as drawn by John H. Reagan, the Confederate of the original draft of Sherman's terms with Johnston, as drawn by John H. Reagan, the Confederate of the original draft of Sherman's terms with Johnston, as drawn by John H. Reagan, the Confederate n for rejecting the convention of Sherman and Johnston which, as I have said, was unanimously accepterman, and on its face shows that both he and Johnston knew that General Sherman had no authority tonot well be disregarded; and in his letter to Johnston of April 21, 1864, he says:-- Although str[2 more...]
, 522, 525; Peabody improvement on, 536. Johnson, Gen., Bushrod, reference to, 649. Johnston, Gen., Joe, at Bull Run, 292-293; official report of, 333; Sherman's negotiations with, 876; referen 598; reference to, 779, 782, 827, 868, 909; Halleck's treatment of, 876-877; negotiations with Johnston, 876; named for major general 877-878; quoted upon West Point, 890; terms of surrender between Johnston, 910-912; his obstinacy, 913; reasons for rejecting convention of Johnston, 913-914; at New Orleans, 896. Ship Island, Butler at, 351-358; Butler moves troops from, 694; Phelps' proclamatiJohnston, 913-914; at New Orleans, 896. Ship Island, Butler at, 351-358; Butler moves troops from, 694; Phelps' proclamation at, 896. Sickles, General, persuades Buchanan<*>to withdraw an order revoking parade of troops, 218. in Halleck's letter to Grant, 878; the hero of Gettysburg, 878; object of jealousy of Republllan telegraphs Halleck from, 872; complaints of Grant, 873; Butler at, 902, 918; convention of Johnston and Sherman rejected at, 913, 914; the Johnson impeachment trial at, 926, 930. Washington an