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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 132 results in 36 document sections:

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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, III. June, 1861 (search)
attanooga — the Secretary got me to send a telegraphic dispatch to his family to repair hither without delay, for military reasons. About this time the Secretary's health gave way again, and Major Tyler had another fit of indisposition totally disqualifying him for business. Hence I have nearly all the correspondence of the department on my hands, since Col. Bledsoe has ceased to write. June 17 To-day there was a rumor in the streets that Harper's Ferry had been evacuated by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, and, for the first time, I heard murmurs against the government. So far, perhaps, no Executive had ever such cordial and unanimous support of the people as President Davis. I knew the motive of the evacuation, and prepared a short editorial for one of the papers, suggesting good reasons for the retrograde movement; and instancing the fact that when Napoleon's capital was surrounded and taken, he had nearly 200,000 men in garrison in the countries he had conquered, which would hav
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, IV. July, 1861 (search)
of military operations on a large scale on the Potomac. We have intelligence that McDowell is making preparations to advance against our forces at Manassas. Gen. Johnston is expected to be there in time; and for that purpose is manoeuvring Gen. Patterson out of the way. Our men have caps now-and will be found in readiness. Theyng from the field before the President appeared upon it. It had been won by Beauregard, who, however, was materially assisted by his superior in command, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Gen. J. remained in the rear, and brought up the reinforcements which gained the day. Beauregard is, to-day, the most popular general in the service. Beful, and ours is decidedly the winning side. These gentry somehow succeed in getting appointments. Our army does not advance. It is said both Beauregard and Johnston are anxious to cross the Potomac; but what is said is not always true. The capabilities of our army to cross the Potomac are not known; and the policy of doing
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
ees there quite handsomely. August 28 Beauregard offers battle again on the plains of Manassas; but it is declined by the enemy, who retire behind their fortifications. Our banners are advanced to Munson's Hill, in sight of Washington. The Northern President and his cabinet may see our army, with good glasses, from the roof of the White House. It is said they sleep in their boots; and that some of them leave the city every night, for fear of being captured before morning. Generals Johnston, Wise, and Floyd are sending here, daily, the Union traitors they discover to be in communication with the enemy. We have a Yankee member of Congress, Ely, taken at Manassas; he rode out to witness the sport of killing rebels as terriers kill rats, but was caught in the trap himself. He says his people were badly whipped; and he hopes they will give up the job of subjugation as a speculation that won't pay. Most of the prisoners speak thus while in confinement. August 29 We hav
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, VI. September, 1861 (search)
etary. September 28 I sent the paper containing my article to J. R. Davis, Esq., nephew of the President, avowing its authorship, and requesting him to ask the President's attention to the subject. September 29 To-day Mr. Benjamin issued several passports himself, and sent several others to me with peremptory orders for granting them. September 30 A pretty general jail delivery is now taking place. Gen. Winder, acting I suppose, of course, under the instructions of the Secretary of War--and Mr. Benjamin is now Secretary indeed — is discharging from the prisons the disloyal prisoners sent hither during the last month by Gens. Johnston, Floyd, and Wise. Not only liberating them, but giving them transportation to their homes, mostly within the enemy's lines. Surely if the enemy reciprocates such magnanimous courtesy, the war will be merely child's play, and we shall be spared the usual horrors of civil war. We shall see how the Yankees will appreciate this kindnes
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 8 (search)
isclosed. They meditate an advance immediately, with 200,000 men. The head of Banks's column is to cross near Leesburg; and when over, a movement upon our flank is intended from the vicinity of Arlington Heights. This is truly a formidable enterprise, if true. We have not 70,000 effective men in Northern Virginia. The lady is in earnest-and remains here. I wrote down the above information and sent it to the President; and understood that dispatches were transmitted immediately to Gen. Johnston, by telegraph. The lady likewise spoke of a contemplated movement by sea with gun-boats, to be commanded by Burnside, Butler, etc. In the evening I met Mr. Hunter, and told him the substance of the information brought by the lady. He seemed much interested, for he knows the calm we have been enjoying bodes no good; and he apprehends that evil will grow out of the order of the Secretary of War, permitting all who choose to call themselves alien enemies to leave the Confederacy.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
aster to the Secretary of War, and intimated that it was attributed to the machinations of the Union men discharged from prison here. It is said Mr. Benjamin denied it-denied that any such men. had been discharged by Gen. Winder, or had been concerned in the affair at all. Of course the President had no alternative but to credit the solemn assertions of his confidential adviser. But my books, and the register of the prisons, would show that the Drainsville prisoners sent hither by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston were discharged by Gen. Winder, and that their expenses home were paid by the government; and officers of unimpeachable veracity are ready to testify that Gen. Stuart was misled by these very men. December 7 Quite a commotion has been experienced in official circles by the departure of Mr. W. H. B. Custis, late Union member of the Virginia Convention, without obtaining a passport to leave the city. Some of his secession constituents being in the city, reported that they knew
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, X. January, 1862 (search)
e United States will soon come to them. Many believe that Burnside will get Norfolk. I think differently, but I may be mistaken. January 22 Some of the letter-carriers' passports from Mr. Benjamin, which have the countenance of Gen. Winder, are now going into Tennessee. What is this for? We shall see. January 23 Again the Northern papers give the most extravagant numbers to our army in Kentucky. Some estimates are as high as 150,000. I know, and Mr. Benjamin knows, that Gen. Johnston has not exceeding 29,000 effective men. And the Secretary knows that Gen. J. has given him timely notice of the inadequacy of his force to hold the position at Bowling Green. The Yankees are well aware of our weakness, but they intend to claim the astounding feat of routing 150,000 men with 100,000! And they suppose that by giving us credit for such a vast army, we shall not deem it necessary to send reinforcements. Well, reinforcements are not sent. January 24 Beauregard has be
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 13 (search)
, will in turn be abandoned, and the enemy will drop out of the State into Alabama or Mississippi. March 2 Gen. Jos. E. Johnston has certainly made a skillful retrograde movement in the face of the enemy at Manassas. He has been keeping McCl Toombs, Wise, Floyd, and others of the brightest lights of the South have been somehow successively obscured. And Joseph E. Johnston is a doomed fly, sooner or later, for he said, not long since, that there could be no hope of success as long as Mrching on the executive prerogative-or failed in some way. The proceedings were in secret session. March 31 Gen. Joseph E. Johnston is to command on the Peninsula. The President took an affectionate leave of him the other day; and Gen. Lee helThere was no necessity for him to endanger it — as had just been done by the brave Sydney Johnston at Shiloh, whose fall is now universally lamented. This Gen. Johnston (Joseph E.) I believe has the misfortune to be wounded in most of his battles
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
ennsylvania by Gen. Stuart and 1500 of his cavalry. He went as far as Chambersburg, which surrendered; and he was gathering horses, etc., for the use of the army, paying for them in Confederate notes. They say he did not disturb any other description of private property without paying for it. I hope he is safely back again by this time. The Northern papers claim a victory in Kentucky-but I shall wait until we hear from Bragg. Gen. Magruder has been assigned to duty in Texas. What Gen. Johnston is to do, does not yet appear. A great many new assistant adjutants and inspector-generals are to be appointed for the generals, lieutenant-generals, majors, and brigadier-generals, having rank and pay of colonels, majors, captains, and lieutenants of cavalry. Like the Russian, perhaps, we shall have a purely military government; and it may be as good as any other. Gold, in the North, is selling at 28 per cent. premium; and Exchange on England at $1.40. This is an indication that t
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XX. November, 1862 (search)
w Orleans. Northern army advancing everywhere. breach between the President and Secretary of War. President's servant arrested for robbing the Treasury. Gen. J. E. Johnston in town. Secretary has resigned. Hon. J. A. Seddon appointed Secretary of War. the enemy marching on Fredericksburg. Lee writes that he will be ready foents. The amount abstracted was $5000--unsigned-but some one, perhaps the negro, for he is educated, forged the Register's and Treasurer's names. I saw Gen. J. E. Johnston standing idle in the street to-day. November 15 Now, by St. George, the work goes bravely on! Another letter on my desk from the President to the Se like submission; and a great fee has been realized by somebody. If the enemy were to take Richmond, this tobacco would be destroyed by the military. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston is assigned to the command of the army of the West. To-day we have a dispatch from Gov. Pettus, saying authority to pass cotton through the lines of t
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