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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
roa was strong enough to fight Lee's army and Johnston's combined, provided that General Grant couldond, and attempt to make junction with General Jos. Johnston in North Carolina, he (General Grant) he matter, and insisted that the surrender of Johnston's army must be obtained on any terms. Genethe terms of capitulation between himself and Johnston were exactly in accordance with Mr. Lincoln's (so considered) liberal terms offered General Jos. Johnston, and, whatever may have been General S fighting for, had conceded every thing to Jos. Johnston, and had, as the boys say, knocked the fatee if we cannot finish the job with Lee's and Johnston's armies. Whether it will be better for you reached Smithfield, and found it abandoned by Johnston's army, which had retreated hastily on Raleigd of consequent desolation? I knew well that Johnston's army could not be caught; the country was tome in from the enemy with a package from General Johnston addressed to me. Taking it for granted th[18 more...]
Kenesaw Mountain was deserted. Johnston moved to the banks of the Chattahoochee, Joseph Johnston and John B. Hood. Johnston's parrying of Sherman's mighty strokes was a model of defensiJohnston's parrying of Sherman's mighty strokes was a model of defensive warfare, declares one of Sherman's own division commanders, Jacob D. Cox. There was not a man in the Federal army from Sherman down that did not rejoice to hear that Johnston had been superseded bJohnston had been superseded by Hood on July 17th. Johnston, whose mother was a niece of Patrick Henry, was fifty-seven years old, cold in manner, measured and accurate in speech. His dark firm face, surmounted by a splendidly iJohnston, whose mother was a niece of Patrick Henry, was fifty-seven years old, cold in manner, measured and accurate in speech. His dark firm face, surmounted by a splendidly intellectual forehead, betokened the experienced and cautious soldier. His dismissal was one of the political mistakes which too often hampered capable leaders on both sides. His Fabian policy in Geoadvancing on Atlanta, and wisely adhered to the plan of the battle as it had been worked out by Johnston just before his removal. But the policy of attacking was certain to be finally disastrous to t
Kenesaw Mountain was deserted. Johnston moved to the banks of the Chattahoochee, Joseph Johnston and John B. Hood. Johnston's parrying of Sherman's mighty strokes was a model of defensiJohnston's parrying of Sherman's mighty strokes was a model of defensive warfare, declares one of Sherman's own division commanders, Jacob D. Cox. There was not a man in the Federal army from Sherman down that did not rejoice to hear that Johnston had been superseded bJohnston had been superseded by Hood on July 17th. Johnston, whose mother was a niece of Patrick Henry, was fifty-seven years old, cold in manner, measured and accurate in speech. His dark firm face, surmounted by a splendidly iJohnston, whose mother was a niece of Patrick Henry, was fifty-seven years old, cold in manner, measured and accurate in speech. His dark firm face, surmounted by a splendidly intellectual forehead, betokened the experienced and cautious soldier. His dismissal was one of the political mistakes which too often hampered capable leaders on both sides. His Fabian policy in Geoadvancing on Atlanta, and wisely adhered to the plan of the battle as it had been worked out by Johnston just before his removal. But the policy of attacking was certain to be finally disastrous to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
eatest energy and zeal. The Medical Director of the army, Surgeon Guild, with the officers of his department, were untiring in their attention to the wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Corley, Chief Quartermaster, took charge of the disposition and safety of the trains of the army. Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, Chief Commissary of its subsistence, and Lieutenant-Colonel Baldwin, Chief of Ordnance, were everywhere on the field attending to the wants of their departments. General Chilton, Chief of Staff, Lieutenant-Colonel Murray, Major Peyton and Captain Young, of the Adjutant and Inspector-General's Department, were active in seeing to the execution of orders. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith and Captain Johnston, of the engineers, in reconnoitering the enemy and constructing batteries; Colonel Long, in posting troops and artillery; Majors Taylor, Talcott, Marshall and Venable, were engaged night and day in watching the operations, carrying orders, &c. Respectfully submitted, R. E. Lee, General.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.38 (search)
r remember, honor and be grateful to them. But I will not admit that the cause is entirely lost. The armies of Generals Joseph Johnston, Dick Taylor and Kirby Smith are still in the field, and may snatch victory from apparent defeat yet. The Yankeeiscouraged, and have given up all hope of the success of our cause. I still have hope from the Southern Fabius, General Joseph Johnston. He is prudent and skillful. We have been deprived of mails for several days, and have had many minor but desirth. The very thought is repulsive in the extreme. April 26th to 29th The distressing news of the surrender of General Johnston to Sherman in North Carolina is announced in words of exultation by the Northern papers. The cup of bitterness and ism with myself to those gallant men who thought best to accept President Johnson's terms after the surrender of Lee and Johnston. They merely felt the utter hopelessness of further resistance earlier than I did, and accepted the dreaded but inevita
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 8: (search)
one hundred thousand men, should have brought Johnston's forty-five thousand to decisive battle in fnorth toward Dalton, and doubtless carried to Johnston the first serious intimation that a heavy forclose support, so that you can hold all of Jos. Johnston's army in check should he abandon Dalton. and the usual impulse of a conquering army. Johnston having retreated in the night of May 15th, immonstration against Buzzard Roost, attracting Johnston's whole attention to that point, and to have yette all our armies will be together, and if Johnston stands at Dalton we must attack him in positiaca, and will there break the road, and leave Johnston out of rations. To-morrow will tell the stornd make this dispatch that you may understand Johnston acts purely on the defensive. I am attackingt we will all get ready. * * * * Do you think Johnston has yet discovered the nature of your forces?l Sherman having refrained from hurrying, and Johnston having virtually escaped him, he telegraphed [20 more...]
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 15: (search)
ith as little reason and success, to be severe upon Mr. Stanton, which may properly be presented in this connection. In the second bulletin which the Secretary of War published on April 27th, concerning General Sherman's arrangements with General Johnston, the following paragraphs appeared from a dispatch of General Halleck's, dated Richmond, April 26th, 9:30 P. M.: The bankers here have information to-day that Jeff. Davis' specie is moving south from Goldsboro, in wagons, as fast as poss General Gillmore. The following is Sherman's gold dispatch: Raleigh, N. C., April 25, 1865. Major-General G. A. Gillmore, Commanding Department of the South, and Real-Admiral John A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron. I expect Johnston will surrender his army. We have had much negotiation, and things are settling down to the terms of Lee's army. Jeff. Davis and his Cabinet, with considerable specie, is making his way toward Cuba. He passed Charlotte, going south, on the 23d
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 16: (search)
ed as to turn its mind toward North Carolina, Johnston had offered to surrender, and so Bentonville e immediately in our front, while the bulk of Johnston's army was supposed to be collecting at or neis movement I hoped General Slocum would hold Johnston's army facing west, while I would come on hisle was on the first day, viz.: the 19th, when Johnston's army struck the head of Slocum's column, kne again refers to the matter, as follows: Johnston had moved, by night, from Smithfield, with grin to General Terry at 6 A. M.: Yesterday Johnston, with his force concentrated, struck my left ick massed his cavalry on the left. General Jos. Johnston had the night before marched his wholen, was about this: With a full knowledge that Johnston was rapidly concentrating all available forcetwo wings of the Union army, each inferior to Johnston's supposed numbers, were allowed to march in be brought up for the first day's fight. General Johnston's force was then estimated at thirty-seve[20 more...]
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 17: (search)
Chapter 17: The terms with Johnston the first draft made by a Confederate Cabinet officer. General Sherman sneers at political generals, and then devotes thirty pages of his Memoirs to an inaccurate history of his own political surrender to General Jos. E. Johnston near Raleigh. The country will never forget its joy over the news from Appomattox, or the chill which shortly after fell upon it when the true character of Sherman's terms became known. If the country at large ever does forget the circumstances attending the latter event, those who were at Raleigh at the time never will. The real character of these terms was carefully concealed there, even from very prominent officers, and was known first at the North. It was given out at Sherman's Headquarters that the terms granted Johnston were virtually the same as those extended by Grant to Lee, and special stress was laid upon the statement that in no sense had General Sherman recognized the political existence
ng Banks from Port Hudson, the garrison of which could then unite with General Joseph Johnston in the rear of General Grant. In the first week in July, twelve gunof the Mississippi River. The reader will not have failed to observe that General Johnston, commanding the department, and General Pemberton, the district commander,and his forces were besieged in Vicksburg, every effort was made to supply General Johnston with an army which might raise the siege. While General Johnston was at JGeneral Johnston was at Jackson, preparing to advance against the army investing Vicksburg, the knowledge that the enemy was receiving large reenforcements made it evident that the most prompt action was necessary for success; of this General Johnston manifested a clear perception, for on May 25th he sent Pemberton the following message: Bragg is sendt giving up Jackson, by which we should lose Mississippi. On June 29th General Johnston reports that— Field transportation and other supplies having been obta
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