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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kenesaw Mountains, action near (search)
ng it with Kenesaw. Sherman continually pressed them heavily, skirmishing in dense forests, furrowed with ravines and tangled with vines. From the top of Kenesaw Johnston could see the movements of the Nationals, and from batteries on its summit could hurl plunging shot. The antagonists struggled on; and finally General Hood rs of lower grade were wounded. The loss of the Confederates, behind their breastworks, was slight. Sherman now disposed his troops so as to seriously threaten Johnston's rear. Turner's Ferry across the Chattahoochee was menaced, and the intended effect was instantaneous. On the night of July 2 Johnston abandoned Kenesaw and aee was menaced, and the intended effect was instantaneous. On the night of July 2 Johnston abandoned Kenesaw and all his intrenchments, and when, at dawn (July 3), the Nationals stood on the crest of that mountain, they saw the Confederates flying through and beyond Marietta towards the Chattahoochee, in the direction of Atlanta.