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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
se places by a fleet of gun-boats with powerful guns, the Wilmington Railroad, Raleigh and Welden would have been within striking distance of our army, and the Confederates would have been obliged to use more northern railroads to obtain their supplies, even if they did not have to evacuate Richmond. The final movement of our army under Sherman in his March to the sea, was directed towards some of these points in North Carolina, and it was not long after this that Lee surrendered and General Joe Johnston laid down his arms. When the Confederates found that the Hatteras forts were incapable of keeping the Federal gun-boats out of the sounds, and that the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers must fall into our hands, they determined to fortify Roanoke Island and prevent our getting into Albemarle Sound; so that they could hold communication with Norfolk through the Currituck Inlet and save Plymouth and the Roanoke River. They were building some heavy iron-clads up that river, and all the materi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
rals of the Confederacy to fall back before his triumphant legions. If the demoralization of the country could ever be brought to the surface, it was when General Joe Johnston was brought to bay at Smithsville, with Sherman's hardy veterans (that had marched through the South) confronting him, and the victorious troops of Schofieove Mobile, and the surrender was agreed upon and accepted on the same basis and terms as were granted by General Grant to General Lee, by General Sherman to General Johnston, and by General Canby to General Taylor, which last surrender was made at the same place and time. The day previous to the receipt of the proposal for surled, 6 wounded; Ida, 2 killed, 3 wounded. Though the war may be said to have virtually ended by the surrender of General Lee, on April 9th, 1865, and of General Joe Johnston, on April 27th, and naval and military operations against the Confederates may be said to have ceased, yet up to the last moment the Texans were apparently
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. Assembling of the naval vessels in Hampton Roads and on the James River. operations of the armies around Richmond. President Lincoln visits City Point. the memorable council on board the River Queen. decision of the council. the terms of surrender offered to General Johnston. ability of the Confederate generals. the example of President Lincoln. the Confederate iron-clads blockaded in the James River. the Confederate fleet as re-organized under Rear-Admiral Semmes. Richmond enveloped. attack on Petersburg. removal of torpedoes and obstructions in the River. Richmond evacuated. Semmes' instructions from the Confederate Secretary of the Navy. blowing up of the Confederate fleet. end of the Confederate Navy. the President visits Richmond. at the residence of Jefferson Davis. an ovation worthy of an emperor. tactics of assassins. justice Campbell visits the