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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 94 results in 15 document sections:

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
ture from Tullahoma for the scene of war, General Johnston had sent an order to General Pemberton inon some four miles west. On the 13th, General Johnston sent a dispatch to the War Department in the order, General Pemberton had written General Johnston, in a note dated the 14th, at 5 P. M.; whign illustrated, that this answer reached General Johnston before the note previously sent. Means growing under Sherman's feet. On the 14th, Johnston, hearing that the Fifteenth Corps was twelve the neighborhood of Jackson, out of which General Johnston had marched with his little army, then 6,y before, disclosing his designs on Dillon's, Johnston instantly replied that the only mode by whichheast. Expecting that this order was obeyed, Johnston marches to the northwest to meet the garrisonthe most important point in the Confederacy. Johnston answers Pemberton encouraging him to hold out points-among them the discussion between General Johnston and the administration as to the authorit[8 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
the Secretary of War, was sent to confer with Johnston, but found him only in time to assist in drawtill hoped at that time that Generals Lee and Johnston might be able to unite their armies at some p Breckenridge was not sent to confer with General Johnston as soon as Mr. Davis heard of the surrend, that Mr. Davis received a dispatch from General Johnston, requesting him to send him assistance inmyself were then sent back by him to join General Johnston at his headquarters, near Hillsboroa, andne at this time, and at the suggestion of General Johnston, and not as soon as Mr. Davis heard of thmination of hostilities, and surrender of General Johnston, on the 27th of April. Now the armisticehe 24th of April General Sherman notified General Johnston it would terminate in forty-eight hours, here until he learned of the surrender of General Johnston, which took place on the 27th of April. when we were attacked. Governor Lubbock, Colonel Johnston, Colonel Wood, and myself had slept under[1 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, and distant Texas, catch the sound-her sons in every clime heed the call of their mother State; and these rush to our Northern border — the very flower of the intelligence, the wealth, the education, the social position, the culture, the refinement, the patriotism, and the religion of the South--to form the armies of the Shenandoah, and Manassas, and Norfolk, which those masters of the art of war, J. E. Johnston and Beauregard, moulded into what was afterward the famous Army of Northern Virginia, with which our peerless Lee won his series of splendid victories. It was common for the Northern press to represent that secession leaders betrayed the people of the South, and led them unawares and unwilling into the rebellion, and many of the so-called histories still insist that the Union men of the South were forced against their will into the revolt. Never were a people more misrepresented. T
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid. (search)
my to which he was attached, and with strict regard to the exigencies of the general campaign. While chiefly employed in what the French term la petite querre, he directed his movements in accordance with the programme of the great war. The military situation in General Bragg's department was ominous of ill-fortune to the Confederates. Bragg's army, always inferior to the one opposing it, in numerical strength, had recently been greatly reduced by large detachments summoned by General Joseph E. Johnston, to aid in his projected movement to relieve Vicksburg. It was confronted at Tullahoma by the vastly superior forces of Rosecrans. General Simon Buckner was holding East Tennessee with a force entirely inadequate to the defense of that important region. General Burnside was concentrating in Kentucky, for the invasion of East Tennessee, a force variously estimated at from twenty to more than thirty thousand men. It was estimated that on the Kentucky and Tennessee border ther
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
The Dalton-Atlanta operations. General Joseph E. Johnston. It is stated on page 24 of General ted, taken by McPherson, would have compelled Johnston to attack him, and with such advantages of nu the former, Polk's and Hood's at Cassville. Johnston determined to attack the column on the directss justified by strong reasons. On the 20th, Johnston's position was unusually strong; by which hislegraph. On the 18th, at his urgent request, Johnston forced the troops on the. high ground, overlose proofs show that the estimate on page 357, Johnston's narrative, which General Sherman pronounceshe might well have thought the breaking up of Johnston's army attainable there. If defeated, Atlant antagonist. Bentonville-pages 303-4-5-6: Johnston attempted to unite the three little bodies ofemory, General Sherman probably attributes to Johnston language that he heard in Raleigh the followiper the terms discussed the day before, which Johnston had given, and sent the paper after him. As s[10 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of Grant. (search)
round that, with such a man besieging them, the city was doomed. Our army occupied the anomalous position of being besiegers and besieged at the same time. Pemberton's army was in front of us in the works, while the army of his confederate, Johnston, almost surrounded us from behind, and was vigilant in seeking either an opportunity to break through and join the forces in Vicksburg or lend them a helping hand in getting out. Many were the adventures, grim sports and escapes we had as we layighting regiments, and closed by asking if she were not glad her boy was not too young to be a soldier? Her answer brought me her blessing and her prayer, and I was doubly rewarded. We at once turned and pursued the enemy in our rear, under Johnston. The Vicksburg prisoners were to go back to a camp of parole, and for days we marched along the country road side by sidelines of the blue and lines of the gray. It was a strange sightthose two armies that only a few hours before had been hurl
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
ion a plan for concentrating a succoring army at Jackson, Mississippi, under the command of General Johnston, with a view of driving Grant from before Vicksburg by a direct issue-at-arms. He suggesteus arrival of these reinforcements would give us a grand army at Tullahoma. With this Army General Johnston might speedily crush Rosecrans, and that he should then turn his force toward the north, ansly upon the forward movement, so as to avoid being seen by the enemy. General Lee ordered Colonel Johnston, of his engineer corps, to lead and conduct the head of the column. My troops, therefore, e the occasion of the delay. It was reported that the column was awaiting the movements of Colonel Johnston, who was trying to lead it by some route by which it could pursue its march without falling, as the head of the column, he had direct orders from General Lee to follow the conduct of Colonel Johnston. Therefore, I sent orders to Hood, who was in the rear and not encumbered by these instruc
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
owed their masters to the field, and devoted themselves to their service in the tenderest way, but fought, bled, and died for them. There are some touching instances of this intercourse and this devotion which are worth relating. When General Joseph E. Johnston was at Jackson, at the Lamar House, in the full tide of a brilliant reception, an old negro woman, in a coarse sunbonnet, with a cotton umbrella under her arm, rapped at the door, and asked: Is dis Mr. Johnston's room? Yes. Mr. Joe JoMr. Johnston's room? Yes. Mr. Joe Johnston's room? Yes. I wants to see him, den ; and in marched the old lady, going up to the distinguished soldier, and laying her hand familiarly upon his epauleted shoulder. Johnston turned, a look of surprise and gladness overspread his face, he took both the bony, bird-claw hands warmly in his own, and exclaimed: Why, aunt Judy Paxton! The old negress scanned his features with tears in her eyes, and at last said, in a querulous treble, made touching with undisguised emotion: Mister Joe, yo
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
We have seen how unceremoniously and cruelly Johnston had been hustled off the stage of Atlanta. Ttion. The President spoke at length. General Johnston sat at as great a distance from him as thspeaking, he remained profoundly silent. General Johnston, Mr. Davis said, we should like to now hesay, General Beauregard? I concur in all General Johnston has said, he replied. There was another man to prepare an interview. No, replied General Johnston-probably anxious to show a mark of defere disappointed. Again, when he had sought General Johnston's demoralized and inconsiderable army, ittold almost at every mile, by stragglers from Johnston's command, was not calculated to inspire themthe Secretary of War, was sent to confer with Johnston, but found him only in time to assist in drawistice concluded between Generals Sherman and Johnston, though not till after the city had fallen innation of hostilities by the surrender of General Johnston, and all the forces under his command eas[8 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
ttle of Manassas, the Black Horse Cavalry was selected by General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the army, to be his body-guard. In this capa Horse with him. In the spring of 1862 the command accompanied General Johnston to Yorktown, and on the march was employed as scouts in the re the earthworks, extending from Yorktown to James river, until General Johnston began to withdraw his forces. The regiment was then sent to Yged the Federal battery, and a brisk cannonade was exchanged. General Johnston, who occupied a favorable position for observation, discoveredwhose fortifications had been constructed by the combined skill of Johnston and Beauregard during the first winter of the war, and now a seconPayne being then a prisoner of war. They had resolved to repair to Johnston's standard, which was still, as they thought, flying in North Caroired to their rendezvous, and informed Lieutenant Ficklin that General Johnston, too, had surrendered, and that the cause for which they had a
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