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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
ks Union mortar-battery before Yorktown. From a photograph. at Yorktown, the commanding general sent the cavalry and horse artillery under Stoneman in pursuit to harass the retreating column. The infantry divisions of Smith (Fourth Corps) and Hooker (Third Corps) were sent forward by two roads to support the column. General Sumner (the officer second in rank in the Army of the Potomac) was directed to proceed to the front and assume command until McClellan's arrival. Stoneman overtook Johnston's rear-guard about noon, six miles from Williamsburg, and skirmished with the cavalry of Stuart, following sharply until 4 o'clock, when he was confronted by a line of redoubts before Williamsburg. The works consisted of a large fort (Magruder) at the junction of two roads running from Yorktown to Williamsburg, and small redoubts on each side of this, making an irregular chain of fortifications extending, with the creeks upon which they rested on either flank, across the peninsula. The Co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
verell; 1st U. S., Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier; 6th U. S., Maj. Lawrence Williams. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. William Hays: B and L, 2d U. S., Capt. James M. Robertson; M, 2d U. S., Capt. Henry Benson; C, 3d U. S., Capt. Horatio G. Gibson; K, 3d U. S., Capt. John C. Tidball. Advance-guard loss (mostly on May 4th) : k, 15; w, 33; m, 1==49. The total loss of the Union army (May 4th and 5th) was 468 killed, 1442 wounded, and 373 captured or missing == 2283. The Confederate forces. General Joseph E. Johnston. Major-General James Longstreet in immediate command on the field. Second division (Longstreet's). First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose P. Hill: 1st Va., Col. Louis B. Williams (w), Maj. William H. Palmer (w); 7th Va., Col. James L. Kemper; 11th Va., Col. Samuel Garland (w); 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Brigade loss: k, 67; w, 245; m, 14 == 326. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (in command on the right), Col. Micah Jenkins: 4th S. C. (Battalion), Maj. C. S. Mattiso
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate use of subterranean shells on the Peninsula. (search)
War, G. W. Randolph, whose decision, favorable to Longstreet's views, was as follows: It is not admissible in civilized warfare to take life with no other object than the destruction of life. . . . It is admissible to plant shells in a parapet to repel an assault, or in a wood to check pursuit, because the object is to save the work in one case and the army in the other A copy of the New York Herald, containing General McClellan's report on buried torpedoes at Yorktown, reached General Johnston, who, in a letter dated May 12th, requested General D. H. Hill to ascertain if there was any truth in it. General Hill referred the matter to Rains, who on May 14th reported in part as follows: I commanded at Yorktown for the last seven months, and when General McClellan approached with his army of 100,000 men and opened his cannons upon us, I had but 2500 in garrison, and our whole Army of the Peninsula, under Major-General Magruder, amounted to but 9300 effective men; then at a sa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
Manassas to Seven Pines. by Joseph E. Johnston, General, C. S. A. Confederate sharp-shooter. Already in this work [Vol. I., p. 240] I have discussed Mr. Davis's statements in his Rise and fall of the Confederate Government, so far as the the south side of James River, and General Wilcox's brigade, which had been previously detached from the army under General Johnston. These reenforcements, together, made about five thousand men [II., p. 85]. He says, on the same page: On ths: As soon as it was definitely ascertained that General McClellan, with his main army, was on the Peninsula, General J. E. Johnston was assigned That assignment was made after the conference at Richmond mentioned on page 203.--Editors. to thearing fully the views of the several officers named, I decided to resist the enemy on the Peninsula. . . . Though General J. E. Johnston did not agree with this decision, he did not ask to be relieved. . . . [II., 87]. Not being in command, I cou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
Maj. D. H. Van Valkenburgh (k), Capt. Peter C. Regan: A, 1st N. Y., Lieut. George P. Hart; H, 1st N. Y., Capt. Joseph Spratt (w), Lieut. Charles E. Mink; 7th N. Y., Capt. Peter C. Regan; 8th N. Y., Capt. Butler Fitch. Artillery loss: k, 7; w, 28; m. 2 = 37. Unattached: E, 1st U. S. Artillery, Lieut. Alanson M. Randol. Loss: k, 1; w, 3 = 4. The total Union loss (Revised Official Returns) was 790 killed, 3594 wounded, and 647 captured or missing = 5031. The Confederate Army. General Joseph E. Johnston (w); Major-General Gustavus W. Smith; General Robert E. Lee. right wing, Major-General James Longstreet. Longstreet's division, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (temporarily). Kemper's Brigade, Col. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.; 7th Va.; 11th Va.; 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Anderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton (w and c), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Steedman; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
who was near, in command of the army. General Johnston also states that three Federal corps on te; and I never questioned the accuracy of General Johnston's statement in regard to the general posidwelling upon what might have happened if General Johnston had not been disabled, or discussing whatne, facing nearly west, as represented by General Johnston) Houses on the battle-field, used as Unly be given. I am far from agreeing with General Johnston in the rose-colored view he takes of the after he was disabled and left the field, General Johnston says: In the evening [June 1st] our troopral days within easy striking distance of General Johnston's army. The intention of the latter to tte in the afternoon, Longstreet called on General Johnston for help, and complained of the latter's D. H. Hill's division attacked in front,--as Johnston certainly intended,--there would have been no, twelve miles below Richmond, and soon after Johnston's army retired, opening the way for McClellan[3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The navy in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
ention of the flag-officer could not be successfully directed at the same instant of time to such varied and complicated movements as were simultaneously in progress in the York River, the James River, Hampton Roads, Albemarle Sound, and the entrance to Wilmington. Of the various plans for a direct movement upon Richmond considered by the civil and military authorities in the winter of 1861-62, that by way of Urbana on the Rappahannock River was finally adopted, but the withdrawal of General Johnston from Centreville led to a change of plan at the last moment; and on the 13th of March it was decided to advance from Fort Monroe as a base. The detailed plan of General McClellan comprehended an attack by the navy upon the batteries at Yorktown and Gloucester, on opposite sides of the York River. It was upon the navy that he chiefly relied to reduce these obstacles to his progress and to clear the way to his proposed base, the White House on the Pamunkey River. This fact was made kno
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I.--General Johnston to the rescue. (search)
I.--General Johnston to the rescue. by P. Y. Dabney. It was the morning of the day on which the battle of Williamsburg was fought that the following incident occurred. Late in the afternoon of the preceding day, general orders had been issued by General Joseph E. Johnston, informing us of the intended retrograde movement on General Joseph E. Johnston, informing us of the intended retrograde movement on the next morning. Among the instructions was one to the effect that any gun caisson, quartermaster, or commissary wagon which might become set in the mud so as to impede the line of march must be destroyed at once. In other words, the road must be kept clear. At that time the writer was a lieutenant in Snowden Andrews's batteryo the regr was at a dead stand-still, when I observed a party of mounted officers coming down the road from the front, and in a few moments more I recognized General Johnston at their head. We all were covered with mud and straining every muscle to e xtricate the gun, when the general, resplendent in uniform, white gauntlets, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ii.--Hood feeling the enemy. (search)
e enemy. by J. H. L. immediately after the battle of Williamsburg, as the Confederates under Johnston were moving back toward Richmond, neither by land nor water, but by a half-and-half mixture of both, General Johnston ordered me to go at once to General Hood. Tell him, he said, that a force of the enemy, estimated at from three to five thousand, have landed on York River, and are ravaging theresult not at all in accordance with the orders or expectations of the general in command. General Johnston seemed greatly annoyed, and sternly ordered me to repeat the exact verbal orders given Hood. Just as I did so, General Hood rode up. He was asked by General Johnston to repeat the orders received from me. When he did so, Old Joe, with the soldierly and game-cock air which characterized him driven them into the river, and tried to swim out and capture the gun-boats. With a smile, General Johnston replied: Teach your Texans that the first duty of a soldier is literally to obey orders.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
Northern Virginia, under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, it was divided into the Valley Dist Beauregard, and Holmes. On October 28th General Johnston ordered Jackson to Winchester to assume cly reestablished his popularity. In March, Johnston withdrew from Manassas, and General McClellann one hundred thousand men on the Peninsula. Johnston moved south to confront him. McClellan had plson's first announcement of the battle to General Johnston, dated March 24th, contained the followino pleasing to the Richmond government and General Johnston that it was decided to reenforce Jackson sides Ewell's division already mentioned, General Johnston could give no further assistance to Jacksemont, Banks, and McDowell long enough to let Johnston try doubtful conclusions with McClellan. If m the Secretary of War. It was from General Joseph E. Johnston, to whom I supposed the Secretary ha hours after receiving this telegram from General Johnston, Jackson was en route for Harrisonburg, w
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