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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A bit of partisan service. (search)
A bit of partisan service. by John S. Mosby, Colonel, C. S. A. Before the first battle of Bull Run I had enlisted as a private in a company of Confederate cavalry of which William E. Jones, a West Point officer, was the captain, and that had been assigned to the 1st Virginia regiment of cavalry, commanded by Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. We joined Stuart at Bunker Hill, a small village on the pike leading from Winchester, where General Johnston had his headquarters, to Martinsburg, where Patterson with his army was lying. Stuart was watching Patterson. In a few days Patterson advanced and took possession of our camp, and our regiment retired toward Winchester. Here I took my first lessons in war. Patterson had no cavalry except a battalion of regulars, and we had no artillery; so he contented himself with throwing an occasional shell at us, and we got out of the way of them as fast as we could. One day we were lying down in a large open field holding our horses when a battery sudd
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
and men to Vicksburg if possible. Holmes, on receiving this order, straightway ordered Hindman to abandon the invasion of Missouri and return to Little Rock with his army. Hindman protested; and to entreaties from Van Dorn, Pemberton, and Joseph E. Johnston (who on the 24th of November had been assigned to the command), and to the reiterated orders of the President and Secretary of War requiring him to reinforce Vicksburg, Holmes only replied that he could do nothing as two-thirds of his forcek Taylor and General Price begged Kirby Smith to concentrate the troops that were scattered through Louisiana, Arkansas and Texas, and to move them northward and into Missouri, where they would at least create a diversion in favor of Lee and of Johnston, even if they did not regain Arkansas and Missouri. Smith listened, but did nothing. Yes!--he asked the President to relieve General Holmes from service in the Trans-Mississippi, and toward the middle of March this was done. General Price w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. (search)
Total Union loss: Killed, 174; wounded, 813; captured or missing, 263 = 1251. General Blunt says ( Official Records, Vol. XXII., Pt. I., p. 76): The entire force . . . engaged did not exceed 7000, about 3000 cavalry not having been brought into action. Confederate: First Corps, Trans-Mississippi army.--Maj.-Gen. Thomas C. Hindman. Fourth (cavalry) division, Brig.-Gen. John S. Marmaduke. Carroll's Brigade, Col. J. C. Monroe: Ark. Reg't, Maj. John B. Thompson; Ark. Reg't, Maj.----Johnston. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 12 =15. Shelby's Brigade, Col. Joseph O. Shelby: 1st Mo., Lieut.-Col. B. F. Gordon; 2d Mo., Col. Beal G. Jeans; 3d Mo., Col. G. W. Thompson; Scouts, Maj. B. Elliott; Quantrill's Co., Lieut.----Gregg; Mo. Battery, Capt. H. M. Bledsoe; Mo. Battery, Capt. Westley Roberts. MacDonald's Brigade, Col. Emmett MacDonald: Lane's Tex. Reg't, Lieut.-Col. R. P. Crump; Mo. Reg't, Lieut.-Col. M. L. Young; Ark. Battery, Capt. Henry C. West. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 22; m, 8=35. T
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
Jefferson Davis and the Mississippi campaign. Reprinted by permission from the North American review for Dec., 1886, Vol. 143, p. 585. by Joseph E. Johnston, General, C. S. A. In Mr. Davis's account of the military operations in Mississippi in 1863, The rise and fall of the Confederate States, by Jefferson Davis. their disastrous result is attributed to my misconduct. My object in the following statement is to exhibit the true causes of those disasters. The combination of Federal military and naval forces which produced that result was made practicable by the military errors of the Confederate Government in 1862, and was made successful by its repetition of the gravest of those errors in 1863. The Confederate army that fought at Shiloh was reorganized by General Beauregard at Corinth, and occupied that position until the 29th of May, 1862, when that officer led it to Tupelo in consequence of the near approach of General Halleck's vastly superior forces. There, about
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
reek in its front. Here General Pemberton wished to wait to be attacked by Grant. There can be no doubt that if he had been allowed to do so a desperate and bloody battle would have been fought on that ground, the issue of which might have been different from that of the two unfortunate engagements which did actually occur. The army remained at Edwards's depot from the 13th to the 15th. During this time General Pemberton received numerous dispatches from President Davis, and from General J. E. Johnston, who had recently arrived at Jackson. I saw, or heard read, most of these dispatches. They were very conflicting in their tenor, and neither those of Mr. Davis nor those of General Johnston exactly comported with General Pemberton's views. He then made the capital mistake of trying to harmonize instructions from his superiors diametrically opposed to each other, and at the same time to bring them into accord with his own judgment, which was adverse to the plan s of both. Mr. Davi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
s, so as to divide your troops and train. Johnston stopped on the Canton road, only six miles nothe fords along the Big Black, and to observe Johnston. I knew that Johnston was receiving reenforcburg as they were against us. But I knew that Johnston was in our rear, and was receiving constant rf June positive information was received that Johnston had crossed the Big Black River for the purpoolding Vicksburg had by this time passed from Johnston's mind. I immediately ordered Sherman to thedefend ourselves against an expected siege by Johnston. But as against the garrison of Vicksburg wey of defending ourselves against an attack by Johnston. From the 23d of May the work of fortifyinl. Pemberton had previously got a message to Johnston suggesting that he should try to negotiate wis from eight to twelve miles off, waiting for Johnston.) I informed them of the contents of Pemberto24 hours to effect a surrender. He knew that Johnston was in our rear for the purpose of raising th[25 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The terms of surrender. (search)
at once to the circumstance that brought about the personal interview referred to. Feeling assured that it was useless to hope longer for assistance from General Johnston, either to raise the siege of Vicksburg or to rescue the garrison, Among General Pemberton's papers was found a copy of the following letter, accompanied by a note stating that the original had miscarried and was never received, but General Johnston was kind enough to furnish me a copy : June 27, 1863. General Pemberton: Your dispatch of the 22d received. General E. H. Smith's troops have been mismanaged, and have fallen back to Delhi. I have sent a special messenger, urging hweakness on my part, which I ought not to make, to propose them. When it becomes necessary to make terms, they may be considered as made under my authority.--J. E. Johnston, General. I summoned division and brigade commanders, with one or two others, to meet in my quarters on the night of the 2d of July. All the correspondence
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. (search)
n of this division was separated from Pemberton after the battle of Champion's Hill, and joined the forces with General Joseph E. Johnston (Pemberton's superior officer) at Jackson, Mississippi.--editors. Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. First Brigade, BrCapt. E. B. Martin; Miss. Cavalry, Col. Wirt Adams. Johnston's forces (engaged only at Raymond and Jackson), General Joseph E. Johnston (in chief command of the departments of Generals Bragg, E. Kirby Smith, and Pemberton). Gregg's Brigade, Bri8th Ky. (mounted), Col. H. B. Lyon. After Grant's withdrawal from Jackson to Vicksburg the reinforcements received by Johnston consisted of the brigades of Rust and Maxey from Port Hudson; Ector's and McNair's brigades and the divisions of Breckin Evans's brigade from Charleston; and the division of Loring, from the force under Pemberton. [See p. 487.] On June 4th Johnston's effectives numbered, according to his own report, 24,000. [See also pp. 478, 479, 480.]--editors. Incomplete repor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
oved to Bayou Sara, where the advance of the army crossed the Mississippi on the night of the 23d and moved immediately to the rear of Port Hudson. There communication was made with Augur's two brigades, which had established themselves in position on the 21st, after a brisk engagement, known as the battle of Plains Store, Augur lost 15 killed, 71 wounded, 14 missing,--total, 1.00; the Confederates, 89. just in time, apparently, to prevent the evacuation, which had been ordered by General Johnston and afterward countermanded by President Davis. With Augur we found T. W. Sherman and two brigades from New Orleans. When the investment was completed on the 26th, we had about 14,000 men of all arms in front of the works, and behind them the Confederates had about 7000, under Major-General Frank Gardner. Part of the garrison (three brigades, as it proved) was known to have gone to succor Vicksburg, and all reports, apparently confirmed by the comparative feebleness of the attack o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
Vicksburg, and that of General Bragg in Tennessee, were placed under General Joseph E. Johnston, and his official headquarters were established at Chattanooga. Immediately thereafter General Johnston visited Murfreesboro‘, where he passed some days devoted to a thorough inspection of the army. Our forces numbered somewhat over 40,000 men. General Johnston's visit, was followed during the second week in December by that of President Davis and his aide, General Custis Lee. The President askep was contrary to the decided opinion previously expressed to Mr. Davis by General Johnston. [See p. 473.] So well satisfied was General Bragg at having extricate army, however, waxed so strong against Bragg that President Davis ordered General Johnston, then near Brigadier-General R. W. Hanson, C. S. A., killed at Stone's Rnessee, with authority, if he thought it wise, to relieve Bragg from command. Johnston's arrival was hailed with joy, for our army specially wanted him as their comm
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