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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
again placed advantage with the White and Red. The divisions of Johnston, Palmer and Reynolds now came into Federal line, to the right of B left, next to Baird's, successively on the right the divisions of Johnston, Palmer and Reynolds. Brennan's division was to be posted in reseon was placed on the extreme left; Wheeler's cavalry on the flank; Johnston's division was next to Hindman's, and Stewart's on the right of JoJohnston's. Each division had two brigades in front and one in the rear. Preston's division was placed in reserve on the left; Law's division in the rear of Johnston's. The brigades of Kershaw and Humphries, of McLaw's division, commanded by Kershaw, were posted in rear of Law. JohJohnston's, Laws's and Kershaw's commands were under Hood, and formed a column of eight brigades, arranged four lines deep. This General Longstrd post four and a half miles to Polk's right, Thomas with Baird's, Johnston's, Palmer's and a part of Reynold's divisions, each division in th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's divisionYorktown and Williamsburg. (search)
force was being collected at Fortress Monroe, General Johnston was sent to examine the position at Yorktown, Meanwhile the army of Northern Virginia (as General Johnston's force was now designated, the department of al Jackson in the Valley. On the arrival of General Johnston on the Peninsula, the Confederate forces now n as to his adversary's numbers and movements. General Johnston was much more accurately informed, although thnder rifles and thirteen inch mortars, decided General Johnston not to undergo the risks of a siege in which tch was prepared against them, and that, therefore, Johnston's retreat was unnecessary. There is no doubt thatthe York to the vicinity of West Point, to cut off Johnston's retreat. The divisions of Hooker, Smith, Kearneliamsburg, and which was at once turned back. General Johnston also returned to the field with it, but did noetreat, and were unprovided with horses. As General Johnston expected to be attacked by the divisions which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
ding, during the winter he had feared, not only to attack Johnston, immensely his inferior in numbers, but to expose himself to Johnston's attack. But his time was come, and the North would wait no longer. By the 20th of February all our heavy parts of A and B, First Maryland, meant, and the rear of Johnston's army thus gained four or five hours march on him. It waused such weapons with such wonderful effect. When General Johnston evacuated Harper's Ferry his command consisted of harad no cartridge boxes. The bold front then showed by General Johnston, with his raw levies, forced Patterson back over the march, the Federal General was left at Charlestown, while Johnston swept down on McDowell's right flank, crushing it in, andexandria railroad to feel our strength on our right. General Johnston, by alert and prompt action, threw his whole army bacn his part. The camp on the Rappahannock. While General Johnston from the Rapidan observed McClellan's movements until
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. (search)
red coming back in great confusion followed by the enemy's, and Breckenridge's force was ordered to the left to repel this cavalry force, which had gotten in rear of my left, and this with the assistance of the artillery he succeeded in doing. But as soon as the firing was heard in rear of our left flank the infantry commenced falling back along the whole line, and it was very difficult to stop them. I succeeded, however in stopping enough of them in the old rifle pits, constructed by General Johnston, to arrest the progress of the enemy's infantry, which commenced advancing again, when the confusion in our ranks was discovered, and would have still won the day if our cavalry would have stopped the enemy's, but so overwhelming was the battle and so demoralized was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. The enemy's cavalry again charged around my left flank and the men began to give way again, so that it was necessory for me to retire through the town. Li
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate treasure-statement of Paymaster John F. Wheless. (search)
before entering the army been a banker of good repute, in Nashville, Tennessee. General Polk wrote warmly recommending him for an appointment as paymaster in the navy, as well because of his capacity as of his integrity and meritorious services in the field. In this new sphere of duty he was connected with the Confederate treasure when it was removed from Richmond and therefore specially well informed concerning it. When he saw the published report of an interview which represented General J. E. Johnston as making injurious reflections on President Davis in connection with the Confederate States treasure removed from Richmond, General Wheless, like other true-hearted Confederates, felt indignant at the slanderous insinuation and published in the Nashville American, of December 25th, a brief but decided refutation of the baseless fiction. At the suggestion of a friend he has written a fuller recital of events which preceded the appointment of Captain M. H. Clark to be treasurer, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence and orders concerning the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
the mischief inevitable from divided commands. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. Headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 21, 1862. General Joseph E. Johnston, Comdg. AGeneral Joseph E. Johnston, Comdg. Army of Northern Virginia. General,--The President desires to know the number of troops around Richmond, how they are posted, and the organization of the divisions and brigades; also, the programme your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 22, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Comdg. Army of Northern Virginia, Headquarters near Richmond, Va. General,--Your letyour obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 22, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Commanding, &c. General,--Your letter of this morning Not found. by Major Whitingto-morrow. I have more than once suggested a concentration here of all available forces. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. P. S.--I shall bring up Huger. J. E. J.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of John C. Mitchel, of Ireland, killed whilst in command of Fort Sumter. (search)
ft salt breeze before their eyes, despite their fierce attacks by land and by sea. It was sometimes shot down as often as six times during the course of a single day, but was always instantly replaced under fire of the heaviest guns that up to that time had ever been used. And it flew proudly there, until that sad night in January, 1865, when Charleston was evacuated, the Confederate authorities having determined to withdraw the troops from her defences, and send them to reinforce General Joseph E. Johnston's little army. The last sun-set gun boomed across the water from Fort Moultrie the evening of the evacuation, and Major Huguenin, who succeeded Mitchel in the command of Fort Sumter, with his own hands drew down the faithful flag that was never more to wave from its oft-broken staff, cut the halliards, and with a heavy heart placed it in his valise. As soon as darkness closed in sufficiently to cover his movements, he crossed the harbor with his little band of veterans and rejo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence and orders concerning the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Correspondence and orders concerning the army of Northern Virginia. Headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 30, 1862. General Joseph E. Johnston, Commanding, &c. : General,--I went as far to-day as your pickets at the bridges on the Chickahominy, where the telegraph road and the old stage road cross that river. Lieutenant-Colond try to find guides. Be ready, if an action should be begun on your left, to fall upon the enemy's left flank. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. P. S.--It is important to move very early. J. E. J. Headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, May 31, 1862. Major-General Huger: Gene you find no strong body in your front, it will be well to aid General Hill; but then a strong reserve should be retained to cover our right. Yours, truly, J. E. Johnston, General. Headquarters right wing, Fairfield Course, Virginia, May 30, 1862. Major T. G. Rhett, Assistant Adjutant-General: Sir,--I have the honor to dra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
ons to sling their cartridge-boxes over their shoulders, but many rounds of ammunition were necessarily lost, as the water was up to their armpits the whole way cross, sometimes deeper. By 8 o'clock my whole corps was over, all fording except Hays's brigade, which was sent with the artillery to the pontoons. While in camp near Darksville, the enemy under Kelly were reported between Martinsburg and Hedgesville, protecting the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and occasionally skirmishing with Johnston's division, which was destroying the track. General Lee directed on the 21st an effort to be made to capture this force, said to be 6,000 strong. Sending Early's division to get in the rear through Mill's Gap and down North Creek, I joined Rodes to Johnson and marched against their front. Though these movements were made in the night of the 21st, the enemy heard of them through spies, and early on the 22d had retreated out of reach. The other corps had already marched towards the Blue
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
Maryland Artillery fell into the enemy's hands. Five of their guns, one hundred and thirty horses and mules, and all the appliances of a six-gun battery were also given up. The detached command. Only one gun, under command of Lieutenant Ritter remained. To trace its history, it will be necessary to return to a point three months previous to the fall of Vicksburg, when, on the 2nd of April, Lieutenant Ritter was ordered to the command of Toomey's detachment of the Third Maryland, and Johnston's detachment of Corput's Georgia battery, previously commanded by Lieutenant T. Jeff. Bates, of Waddell's Alabama Artillery. This section, with one of a Louisiana battery under Lieutenant Cottonham, and one of Bledsoe's Missouri battery, were all under the command of Lieutenant R. L. Wood, of the Missouri Artillery, and were part of a force under Brigadier-General Ferguson, which had for several months been operating along the Mississippi. Their employment was to harrass the enemy, by fir
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