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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ginia, until the surrender at Appomattox; while the Sixty-third Georgia was sent to Dalton, serving from that time until Johnston's capitulation in North Carolina, in the army of Tennessee. Additional particulars of the Twelfth Georgia battalion andnt to West Virginia under Floyd, then commanding in the Kanawha valley; in November, 1861, was ordered to report to Joseph E. Johnston at Manassas, and from that time it followed the fortunes of the army of Northern Virginia. Col. Brumby was succeedend glories of Chickamauga. It participated in the Atlanta, Tennessee and North Carolina campaigns, surrendering with J. E. Johnston. Soon after Chickamauga Colonel Wilson was promoted to brigadier-general, but in the same month he died. W. J. Winn the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, during the greater part of 1863 in north Mississippi under Gen. J. E. Johnston, in C. C. Wilson's brigade; was in the battle of Chickamauga, in the Atlanta campaign of 1864, in Hood's expeditio
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
defend the soil of the Old Dominion at every point. Of the Georgia regiments ordered there, part were assigned to the army of the Shenandoah commanded by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. The Second brigade of that army consisted of the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Eleventh Georgia regiments of infantry, and the First Kentucky, and was commeorge B. McClellan, commanding the Federal army in western Virginia, opened his campaign about the same time that Gen. Robert Patterson began his advance against Johnston in the Shenandoah. But McClellan had carried his campaign to a triumphant conclusion more than a week before the disaster to the Federal arms at Manassas. Hencnd gave them courage for any new enterprise that might be required. Having been informed that McDowell was on the march to attack Beauregard at Manassas, Gen. J. E. Johnston, leaving part of his force to watch and impede the progress of Patterson in the Shenandoah valley, skillfully eluded the Federal commander and led 8,000 men
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
mpaign of the Carolinas, surrendering with J. E. Johnston. Its colonel, J. T. McConnell, died from number, and again followed the lead of Gen. J. E. Johnston in the campaign of the Carolinas, surrennessee, and was in the Carolinas under Gen. J. E. Johnston, surrendering April 26, 1865. The rostth it, and it followed again the lead of Joseph E. Johnston in the campaign of the Carolinas, surrenrst Georgia Confederate battalion. Under General Johnston it participated in the campaign of the Cain the campaign of the Carolinas in which General Johnston was again in command of the army, whose lbrigade to Jackson, Miss., to reinforce Gen. J. E. Johnston, who was gathering an army with which tn of the Carolinas, surrendering with Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Some of the changes in its officersrolinas which closed with the capitulation of Johnston, April 26, 1865. The Columbus Light Artillippi. It was at Jackson in the army of Gen. J. E. Johnston; served in the Meridian campaign in 186[1 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
. Atkinson; Thirty-first, Col. C. A. Evans; Thirty-eighth, Col. Augustus R. Wright; Sixtieth, Col. W. H. Stiles; Sixty-first, Col. John H. Lamar, arrived in Virginia. These regiments had been serving on the Georgia coast under General Lawton since the fall of 1861, and some of the troops, especially of the Thirteenth regiment, had been engaged in two spirited affairs on Whitemarsh island, below Savannah, in March and April, 1862. On the 11th of June, Gen. R. E. Lee, who had succeeded J. E. Johnston, wrote to Jackson: The practicability of reinforcing you has been the subject of earnest consideration. It has been determined to do so at the expense of weakening this army. Brigadier-General Lawton with six regiments from Georgia is on the way to you, and Brigadier-General Whiting with eight veteran regiments leaves here today. The object is to enable you to crush the forces opposed to you. Leave your enfeebled troops to watch the country and guard the passes, covered by your ca
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
cksburg the Gettysburg campaign. The campaigns which mainly influenced the events of 1863 were those of Grant in Mississippi, which ended in the surrender of Vicksburg, and of Lee in Pennsylvania, which terminated at Gettysburg. Barton's and Cumming's Georgia brigades had been sent to the defense of Vicksburg in December, 1862, and early in May, 1863, after Grant had landed south of the river city, Brig.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker was sent from Georgia to reinforce the command which Gen. J. E. Johnston was hastily gathering at Jackson. Under Walker's command were the Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Twenty-ninth, Col. William J. Young; Thirtieth, Col. Thomas W. Mangham; First battalion sharpshooters, Maj. Arthur Shaaff, and Martin's Georgia battery. In Gist's brigade, sent from South Carolina at the same time, were the Forty-sixth Georgia, Col. Peyton H. Colquitt, and the Eighth battalion, Capt. Z. L. Watters. Walker was at Jackson in time to march to the support of Gr
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
battle of Missionary Ridge battle of Ringgold gap retreat to Dalton Gen. J. E. Johnston given command close of 1863. On November 3, 1863, General Bragg sum was a general desire on the part of the country and of the army that Gen. Joseph E. Johnston should be put in command. Gen. Leonidas Polk wrote to the President, y you in this, and that magnanimity perhaps may require it at your hands. General Johnston was assigned to command December 16th, and assumed this position of tremenrtened, and deprived of ordnance and material, and the hope was expressed that Johnston's presence would do much to re-establish hope and inspire confidence. . . . Itd restore the prestige of Confederate arms. In his answer to the President, Johnston stated that to assume the offensive he must either invade middle or east Tennessee spent the winter in the positions taken when the Federal pursuit stopped, Johnston fearing to remove to a better strategic line in the rear lest he might create
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
overy of much lost territory. So when the armies in Virginia and Georgia stood up for battle in the early days of May, 1864, they entered upon their campaigns with the confidence of victory. The army of Tennessee fully believed that under Joseph E. Johnston they would recover all that had been lost, while the army of Northern Virginia had implicit confidence in Robert E. Lee. In each of these grand armies Georgia was well represented in the number and quality of her troops in every arm of thharge, capturing several hundred prisoners and relieving Doles, who though hard pressed had held his ground. On the 6th of May it was upon the suggestion of Gordon that the attack was made upon the Federal right, and his brigade, supported by Johnston's North Carolinians and Hays' Louisianians, charged with such vehemence as to take a mile of the Federal works, and capture 600 prisoners, including Generals Seymour and Shaler. General Ewell in his report says that General Gordon sent word to h
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ebruary fighting near Dalton organization of Johnston's army campaign from Dalton to the Chattahonable to draw them up a trifling hill. Under Johnston's management there was soon great improvementng ground only to the south of the Etowah. Johnston was in a rough and partially mountainous counvantage of the topography, and while covering Johnston's front, to move his surplus force against thhe returns of May 31st. On the 5th of May, Johnston's army was concentrated near Dalton. Stewartand Cantey's, with artillery. The army under Johnston thus increased, numbered, according to the reon the latter hill) might be easily isolated, Johnston, Hardee and Polk rode to the summit to surveyan determined to try a direct front attack on Johnston's line. He says: The enemy and our own officers to withdraw at dawn. During the night, Johnston fell back from Smyrna and took position in thton to fall back beyond the Chattahoochee. Johnston next occupied a line convex to the enemy, beh[53 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
upplies, Hunter successfully accomplished his mission and then returned to Savannah. As he approached the city, however, he found the Federal batteries in position, and after a gallant attempt to pass, in which the transport was disabled and captured, he was compelled to take his two small wooden gunboats up the river. Taking advantage of unusually high water, he was enabled to pass the obstructions and reach Augusta, where he and the most of his command were finally surrendered under General Johnston's capitulation. To open up communications with the Federal fleet, Howard marched farther south and rebuilt King's bridge, while Kilpatrick reconnoitered Fort McAllister, upon which fire was opened by DeGress' battery on the 13th. Hazen's division, which, with J. E. Smith's division, had marched by Statesboro where a number of their foragers had been killed and captured by Confederate cavalry, and later had forced a passage across the Canouchee opposed by Confederate infantry and art
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