hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 342 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 333 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 292 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 278 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 267 45 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 263 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 252 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 228 36 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 228 22 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph E. Johnston or search for Joseph E. Johnston in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
d followed and whose fate he had shared through the trying vicissitudes of more than two years of active operations. His request was granted and Lieutenant-General Hardee temporarily placed in command, in a short time to be replaced by General Joseph E. Johnston. But the President, knowing General Bragg's abilities and appreciating them, was not disposed so summarily to dispense with his services, and hence immediately called him to Richmond in the capacity of military adviser. Thus ended theut one visit to his old and to him cherished command, and then to find it sadly changed—a visit pregnant with the issues of its life or death and involving the very existence of the Confederacy. It was at or about the time of the removal of General Johnston from, and the substitution of the bravest of the brave, the gallant J. B. Hood, to the command of the army with the rank of General. General Hood Commanding army of Northern Georgia. Hood was offered a sacrifice on the shrine of his c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
. Doles's brigade. Cook's brigade. Fourth Georgia, Colonel Philip Cook. Twelfth Georgia, Colonel Edward Willis. Twenty-first Georgia, Colonel John T. Mercer. Forty-fourth Georgia, Colonel W. H. Peebles. Battle's brigade. Brigadier-General C. A. Battle. Third Alabama, Colonel Charles Forsyth. Fifth Alabama, Colonel J. M. Hall. Sixth Alabama, Colonel J. N. Lightfoot. Twelfth Alabama, Colonel S. B. Pickens. Sixty-first Alabama, Major [Lieutenant-Colonel] L. H. Hill. Johnston's brigade. in Ramseur's division. Fifth North Carolina, Colonel T. M. Garrett. Twelfth North Carolina, Colonel H. E. Coleman. Twentieth North Carolina, Colonel T. F. Toon. Twenty-third North Carolina, Major C. C. Blacknall. Third army corps. Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill Commanding. Mahone's division. return reports but one General officer present for duty; name not indicated. Sanders's brigade. Eighth Alabama, Colonel Y. L. Royston. Ninth Alabama, Colonel J. H. Ki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flag Presentation to the Washington Artillery. (search)
a mistake, and he did all in his power to accomplish that end, General Johnston, as the Commander in-Chief of our united forces, greatly assised. Finally the three senior Generals, at Fairfax Courthouse—Generals Johnston, Beauregard and G. W. Smith—met in conference in the latter pbeen sent—one of several presented by General Beauregard, says General Johnston, was selected. I modified it, he continues, only by making th referred to, and which, with the modification decided upon by General Johnston, became the renowned and glorious battle-flag of our Southern ds—no, those from whose hearts—they came. One of them was for General Johnston, another for General Beauregard, the third for General Van Dorate capital, they soon became informed of the action taken by Generals Johnston and Beauregard, to procure a battle-flag for our troops. Thee the flag specially intended for General Beauregard. What Generals Johnston and Van Dorn did with their flag, I cannot say, though I a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the last campaign of the army of Tennessee, from May, 1864, to January, 1865. (search)
may be of use that bears upon the war, it is offered for what it is worth.] After Missionary Ridge. It was whilst we, the shattered remnants of Bragg's army, lay cowering among the hills of Dalton, Ga., in the winter of 1863, that General Joseph E. Johnston came to us and assumed command. He arrived on the 27th of December, and immediately bent all his energies to the almost superhuman task before him: the task of shaping from a starved, ragged, ill-used mob of men, a disciplined comman at Dalton. Our sufferings were such as we had never known before, for the winter was upon us with all its rigor. And conscious of having inflicted one of the greatest calamities of the war, upon the cause we fought for, and of acting as a body, ignominiously, and yet feeling that we were not responsible for the result of affairs, and were not deserving of the stigma which the whole country would certainly put upon us, we were controlled by a feeling of reckless despair, when Johnston arrived.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
attempt to trace the development of our work in its order, as I at first intended, but will note simply what I can recollect, paying some attention to the succession of events. The winter of 1861-1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for on every hand—Bragg, at Pensacola, for his big ten-inch Columbiads: Lovell, at New Orleans, for his extended defences, and especially for his inadequate artillery at Forts Jackson and St. Phillips; Polk, at Columbus, Kentucky; Johnston, for his numerous batteries on the Potomac; Magruder, at Yorktown. All these were deemed most important points. Then came Wilmington, Georgetown, Port Royal, and Fernandina. Not a few of these places sent representatives to press their claims—Mr. Yulee from Fernandina, and Colonel Gonzales from Charleston. Heavy guns, too, were called for in all directions—the largest guns for the smallest places. The abandonment of the line of the Potomac, and of the upper Mississippi from Columbus <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
attempt to trace the development of our work in its order, as I at first intended, but will note simply what I can recollect, paying some attention to the succession of events. The winter of 1861-1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for on every hand—Bragg, at Pensacola, for his big ten-inch Columbiads: Lovell, at New Orleans, for his extended defences, and especially for his inadequate artillery at Forts Jackson and St. Phillips; Polk, at Columbus, Kentucky; Johnston, for his numerous batteries on the Potomac; Magruder, at Yorktown. All these were deemed most important points. Then came Wilmington, Georgetown, Port Royal, and Fernandina. Not a few of these places sent representatives to press their claims—Mr. Yulee from Fernandina, and Colonel Gonzales from Charleston. Heavy guns, too, were called for in all directions—the largest guns for the smallest places. The abandonment of the line of the Potomac, and of the upper Mississippi from Columbus <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last letters and telegrams of the Confederacy—Correspondence of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
ge,—The officers named shall be sent. J. E. Johnston, General This paper is endorsed as followset General Sherman at the same place. J. E. Johnston, General Greensboroa, April 24th. Hon. Jom Washington to-day. Please answer. J. E. Johnston, General Greensboroa, Apl. 24th. Hon. J.tte, N. C., April 24, 1865, 11 P. M. Gen'l J. E. Johnston, Greensboro, N. C.,—Does not your suggeof his officer from Washington to-morrow. J. E. Johnston. Charlotte, N. C., April 23, 1865. To made on the 18th inst., by and between Gen. J. E. Johnston, of the Confederate States Army, and Gerom Major-General Sherman and one from General J. E. Johnston. These communications were immediaton to Major-General Stoneman. (Signed) J. E. Johnston. I have sent a flag of truce, with ad on the back in pencil: Telegram from General J. E. Johnston—ans' d. C. R. B. Greensboroa, April force to prevent devastation of country. J. E. Johnston, General. Headquarters Gilbert's House[2 more...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A morning call on General Kilpatrick. (search)
ir which, as far as I know, has not been recorded, or even dignified by a name; yet it was not without brilliancy in conception and romantic dash in execution, and its results failed of being decisive simply from the vast disproportion of numbers. If it had occurred in the first American war for independence its achievements would have been chronicled with flourishes of the historic pen, and it might have supplied a theme for many a fervid centennial speaker. Some weeks afterwards, when Johnston's army had been disbanded, I passed over the ground of this fight, as I was making my way southward by night. I reached the house which had been Kilpatrick's headquarters at a late hour, and a more dismal, unearthly scene than I beheld it would be difficult to imagine. The dwelling was entirely deserted. Perhaps its owner, driven forth from her home with her little ones to make room for the Woman of the Ditch, had perished from hunger and exposure. At all events it was unoccupied by an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
ge, intermingled almost in a solid mass, and the exit kept clear in order that no time might be lost in the transit. This part of the retreat was admirably managed, and much credit was due the engineers who had it in charge. Two batteries of Johnston's battalion, with several others, were planted on the river bank below the bridge, to prevent the enemy's gunboats from coming up while the army was crossing. They were poorly protected, and suffered considerably from the unequal contest, thoug, Captain and Assistant-Adjutant. To Captain William L. Ritter, Through Colonel M Smith: General Beauregard made a request of General Hood, to send his son's battery, with the first battalion of artillery that was sent to South Carolina. Johnston's battalion being the first ordered there, Captain Beauregard's battery was sent with it instead of the Third Maryland, which was transferred to Cobb's battalion, Smith's regiment of artillery. On the 25th, the battalion was ordered two miles
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
s special hostility is Mr. Davis, but the Confederate Secretaries of War, the chiefs of the war bureaus in Richmond, and Generals Cooper, Lee, A. S. Johnston, J. E. Johnston, besides many of lower rank, come in for their share of criticism — a criticism often ill-judged, in most cases partial, and nearly always truculent. The a meagre supplies the South could then command, and by the middle of July numbered about 20,000 men. The other Confederate army, of about 10,000 men, under General J. E. Johnston, was opposing General Patterson's advance into the Shenandoah Valley. Besides these, General Holmes had a small force on the lower Potomac. Both of the w General Beauregard's career in the West in connection with Hood's disastrous campaign, or his operations in Sherman's front in the spring of 1865, until General J. E. Johnston was placed in command. There was nothing done on either of these fields, however, that could add to the reputation which General Beauregard won at Charle
1 2